Bad

The volume of passenger transport demand has been increasing in Slovenia for several decades. Above all the volume of two most unsustainable modes – passenger cars and air transport (especially after 2002). The growth stopped after the economic recession in 2008 but intensified again after 2014. In 2020 and 2021 the pandemics caused another, steep decline. Trend of the public transport modes has been declining for decades, especially the proportion of intercity bus services.

Bad

Road goods transport has been growing sharply since Slovenia joined the EU, as the volume of tonne-kilometres of the Slovenian transport carriers increased by more than 2,5 times in the period 2004-2019. The growth of freight transport and transit in Slovenia has been constant in road, rail and maritime transport since independence, despite intermediate economic problems in the EU during the recession 2008-2014. The exception is air freight transport, which has stagnated for years after a sharp decline in 2008.

Good

In the first decade of this century, Slovenia focused the majority of its investments in the road network, especially on the construction of the motorway. Investments in railways have been neglected and therefore, uncompetitive with the road transport. After 2011, this trend is changing, although the total volume of investments in transport infrastructure has decreased significantly since 2008. Since 2010, Slovenia has been allocating a larger share of funds to the modernization and upgrading of the railway network.

Bad

Energy consumption in transport has been declining slightly in recent years. This is due to combination of lower domestic vehicle consumption as well as lower sales to foreign vehicles. Most of the energy is used in road transport. Consumption of diesel fuel in road transport is increasing.

 

 

Bad

The assessment of external costs of transport in Slovenia for 2002 varies between 6 and 9.8 % of GDP, which is at the level of the EU-15 average (7 %). The majority (over 90 %) of all external costs of transport in Slovenia are caused by road transport.

Neutral

Both the residents of the EU-27 countries and the residents of Slovenia are only partially aware of the problem of increasing transport and its consequences for the environment and health. Public awareness of the impact of transport on the environment is still relatively low, although the differences between European countries are considerable. People's awareness of the environmental problems of transport does not automatically lead to changing their travel habits, even though this would contribute to their better health.

Bad

Data on air pollution shows that Slovenian cities are over-polluted with NO2 and PM10. Transport is one of the main causes of this pollution. Air quality in Slovenian cities improved during the economic recession after 2008, and after 2016 the NO2 pollution became worse again.

Neutral

In the last decades, major emissions of air pollutants from transport decreased. However, road transport remains one of the most significant sources of air pollution. In Slovenia in 2020 road transport contributed 38 % to the total emissions of nitrogen oxides. In the period 1990-2020 emissions of substances that cause acidification and emissions of ozone precursors in transport sector declined by 74 % and 77 %. In the period 2000-2020 emissions of particulate matter decreased by 56 %.

Bad

Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from transport in Slovenia almost tripled between 1986 and 2019. In the EU, GHG emissions from transport also exceed economic growth on average, but significantly less than in Slovenia; in the period 1990-2019, they increased by 23.6% in the EU-28. The main source of GHG is mostly road transport, which contributes as much as 99% of all GHG emissions from transport.

Bad

Passenger car ownership in Slovenia has almost doubled over the last 20 years and has an above-average growth rate. It is closely connected to the use of passenger cars. Since 2008, passenger car ownership in Slovenia has been growing more slowly as a result of the economic recession. Also, motorisation level (expressed in the number of cars per thousand inhabitants) in Slovenia exceeds the average rate of motorisation in the EU as well as in numerous more economically developed EU countries.