OKOLSJKI KAZALCI

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Bad

The volume of passenger transport has been increasing in Slovenia for several decades, primarily due to the growth of the most unsustainable modes – passenger cars and (especially after 2002) air transport. This growth stopped after the economic recession in 2008. The volume of public transport has been declining for decades, especially the modal share of bus services. In the last decade, the modal share of public transport stabilised, but at a much lower level compared to 1991, when Slovenia became independent.

Bad

Road freight transport has increased dramatically since Slovenia joined the EU. This is due to the increased volume of tonne-kilometres of Slovenian transport carriers. In the period 2004–2014, road freight transport increased by approximately 80%. Despite the economic crisis in the EU, growth has continued, with the exception of aviation transport. After 2011, the share of road transport stabilised.

Neutral

Over the past decade, Slovenia has been funnelling the majority of its investments into its road network, particularly the motorways. Investments in railways have been neglected, which is why railways have not been able to compete with road transport. But this trend has been changing since 2011. Investments in rail transport have been increasing since 2014. The proportion of funds allocated to railways in 2014 amounted to 52%, which is above the EEA-33 average. The total volume of investments in 2014 represented 59% of investments in 2008.

Bad

Energy consumption in transport has gradually increased after the decrease caused by the economic crisis. In 2012, the share of transport in the final use of energy equalled the highest share reached so far. Most energy is consumed in road transport, which is also growing at the fastest rate.

Bad

The assessment of external costs of transport in Slovenia for 2002 varies between 6 and 9.8 % of GDP, which is at the level of the EU-15 average (7 %). The majority (over 90 %) of all external costs of transport in Slovenia are caused by road transport.

Neutral

Inhabitants of the EU-27, including Slovenia, are only partially aware of the problem of increasing volume of transport and its environmental consequences. Public awareness about the effects of transport on the environment is still at a relatively low level, although differences between European countries are substantial. People's awareness of environmental problems caused by transport does not automatically lead to changing mobility habits and is not always reflected in changed behaviour of the population.

Bad

Data on air pollution shows that Slovenian cities are overpolluted, primarily with NO2 and PM10. Transport is one of the main causes of this pollution. In general, air quality is improving, especially since the economic downturn in 2008 after which the volume of passenger traffic was reduced.

Neutral

Over the last few decades, emissions of major air pollutants from transport have decreased. However, road transport remains one of the most significant sources of air pollutants. In 2014, road transport contributed about 52% to total emissions of nitrogen oxides in Slovenia. In the period 1990–2014, emissions of acidifying substances from the transport sector were reduced by 46%. In the same period, emissions of ozone precursors and particulate matter from transport were also reduced (by approximately 63% and 18% respectively).

Bad

In 2012, greenhouse gas emissions from transport in Slovenia had increased by 185% compared to 1986. Also, at the EU level, GHG emissions from transport by far exceeded the growth – in the period 1990–2014, they increased by 13% (in Slovenia, they increased by slightly less than 97% in the same period). A major source of GHGs is road transport, which contributed approximately 99.2% in 2012. The share of GHG emissions from transport (31% in 2012) and insufficiently effective measures to reduce GHGs makes fulfilling commitments under the Kyoto Protocol difficult to accomplish in Slovenia.

Neutral

Although the annual number of fatalities in road transport in Slovenia has been declining for decades and has almost halved in the last 20 years, traffic accidents over the last decade took more than 190 lives a year, on average. The number of deaths in road accidents has been declining over the last decade. This positive trend is also seen in most other European countries.