KAZALCI OKOLJA

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Bad

In Slovenia, the share of one-member households - with higher expenditures and also a greater impact on the environment - has been rapidly increasing in the last ten years. Most households own all the usual household appliances (e.g. washing machine, refrigerator, etc.) and have been rapidly equipping themselves with new ones in recent years; thus electricity consumption does not decrease but increases slightly. Also, a third of households would not be able to cover unexpected expenses and just under a fifth survive a month without financial problems.

Bad

More than half of dwellings / houses in Slovenia were built before 1980 or more than three quarters before 1990. Their renovation has the greatest potential to reduce environmental impacts and reduce energy consumption. At the same time, the share of low-income households - those that are supposed to invest in housing / house renovations - is relatively high. These households also have the most problems with housing conditions or housing deprivation and overcrowding.

Bad

Households in Slovenia consume 21.6% of final energy. In 2019, consumption was the lowest in the observed period from 2000 to 2019, but even higher than the target for 2020. Most energy is used for heating. Among energy products, use of heating oil decreased sharply while the use of natural gas increased.

Bad

Household electricity consumption is increasing and amounted to 3,000 GWh in 2009. The share of households equipped with electricity-consuming appliances is increasing as well. These include e.g. dishwashers, clothes dryers, mobile phones, CD players, microwaves, and personal computers. Despite the improved energy efficiency of some appliances, electricity consumption has not decreased, as the number of household appliances continues to increase rapidly, which also contributes to excessive quantities of waste.

Bad

On average, households expenditure by consumption purpose in Slovenia was devoted predominantly on transport, housing, food and non-alcoholic beverages. For the households in the lowest income class, housing and food  account for almost 46% of household expenditure. In the lowest income group there is energy poverty emerging. Statistics show that households are among the largest polluters with emissions into the air (in particular with CO2, HFC and CO), and from all sector activities pay the most environmental taxes.

 

Bad

The trend of food consumption after 2000 is slightly declining in almost all categories. One possible explanation for this decline is probably changed eating habits when we eat less at home. At the same time, there is a marked upward trend in food and beverage costs. The results of research show that of all food categories, meat and dairy products have the highest environmental impacts.

Bad

In Slovenia, passenger car transport is increasing and public transport is decreasing. The increase in car ownership can be attributed to ideas about greater flexibility, improved mobility and low quality of public passenger transport. The share of Slovenian households owning a personal car increased to 80% in 2007 and the number of passengers using urban public transport dropped by nearly 50% compared to 1990. The data for Central Slovenia and the Podravje statistical regions show that more than 70% of the population travel to work by car.

Good

The eco-innovation index shows the performance of individual Member States in the various components of eco-innovation compared to the EU average, and presents their strengths and weaknesses. The eco-innovation composite index 2017 for Slovenia reveals that Slovenia performs well in all five components of the index and even above the EU average, except in the resource efficiency componen.

Bad

Our society, its production and consumption systems, is based on the use of raw materials such as biomass, fossil fuels and minerals. By increasing the extraction of raw materials, the associated environmental and social impacts are approaching or already exceeding natural limits.

According to available UN data for the period 1990 to 2015, Slovenia achieved no decoupling of economic development from raw material consumption.

In 2015, only five EU countries: Germany, Austria, Slovenia, Belgium and the Netherlands, recycled at least half of their municipal waste.

Neutral

More and more foreign tourists are coming to Slovenia, while the private travels of the domestic population are more or less constant over the almost ten-year period observed. The data also show that income and household size are an important reason for not traveling. In 2018, more than one quarter (28.3%) of Europeans could not afford annual weekly leave outside the home, while such Slovenians accounted for a good fifth (21.8%).


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