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Bad

In Slovenia, the share of one-member households - with higher expenditures and also a greater impact on the environment - has been rapidly increasing in the last ten years. Most households own all the usual household appliances (e.g. washing machine, refrigerator, etc.) and have been rapidly equipping themselves with new ones in recent years; thus electricity consumption does not decrease but increases slightly. Also, a third of households would not be able to cover unexpected expenses and just under a fifth survive a month without financial problems.

Bad

More than half of dwellings / houses in Slovenia were built before 1980 or more than three quarters before 1990. Their renovation has the greatest potential to reduce environmental impacts and reduce energy consumption. At the same time, the share of low-income households - those that are supposed to invest in housing / house renovations - is relatively high. These households also have the most problems with housing conditions or housing deprivation and overcrowding.

Bad

Households in Slovenia consume 21.6% of final energy. In 2019, consumption was the lowest in the observed period from 2000 to 2019, but even higher than the target for 2020. Most energy is used for heating. Among energy products, use of heating oil decreased sharply while the use of natural gas increased.

Bad

Household electricity consumption is increasing and amounted to 3,000 GWh in 2009. The share of households equipped with electricity-consuming appliances is increasing as well. These include e.g. dishwashers, clothes dryers, mobile phones, CD players, microwaves, and personal computers. Despite the improved energy efficiency of some appliances, electricity consumption has not decreased, as the number of household appliances continues to increase rapidly, which also contributes to excessive quantities of waste.

Bad

On average, households expenditure by consumption purpose in Slovenia was devoted predominantly on transport, housing, food and non-alcoholic beverages. For the households in the lowest income class, housing and food  account for almost 46% of household expenditure. In the lowest income group there is energy poverty emerging. Statistics show that households are among the largest polluters with emissions into the air (in particular with CO2, HFC and CO), and from all sector activities pay the most environmental taxes.

 

Bad

The trend of food consumption after 2000 is slightly declining in almost all categories. One possible explanation for this decline is probably changed eating habits when we eat less at home. At the same time, there is a marked upward trend in food and beverage costs. The results of research show that of all food categories, meat and dairy products have the highest environmental impacts.

Bad

In Slovenia, passenger car transport is increasing and public transport is decreasing. The increase in car ownership can be attributed to ideas about greater flexibility, improved mobility and low quality of public passenger transport. The share of Slovenian households owning a personal car increased to 80% in 2007 and the number of passengers using urban public transport dropped by nearly 50% compared to 1990. The data for Central Slovenia and the Podravje statistical regions show that more than 70% of the population travel to work by car.

Bad

The eco-innovation index shows the performance of individual Member States in the various components of eco-innovation compared to the EU average, and presents their strengths and weaknesses. The overall Eco-innovation Index 2019 for Slovenia is 94, placing Slovenia on 15th rank and below the EU average. Slovenia composite index has significantly deteriorated compared to 2017, when it was at 115; placing Slovenia just behind the leading eco-innovative countries.

Bad

In 2019, the material footprint of households in Slovenia amounted to around 15 tons per inhabitant, which is more than the EU average (14.6 tons per inhabitant). Finland, Romania, Estonia and Luxembourg have the largest material footprint with around 28-29 tonnes per capita, the Netherlands the lowest with 7.4 tonnes.

Neutral

In Slovenia, tourism has recorded constant growth since 1992, and the number of overnight stays has tripled in the 1930s. We recorded particularly high growth in the last five years before the pandemic, and Slovenia established itself as an attractive green destination. In 2021 and 2022, the arrivals and overnight stays of domestic guests increased, but the share of foreign guests dropped significantly due to the pandemic. Otherwise, trips by households of all size categories declined in Slovenia in 2020, especially for single-member households.


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