KAZALCI OKOLJA

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Neutral

In Europe 12.9%, infants die due to respiratory diseases. Data for Slovenia show that in 2017, 6.7% of all infants aged 28-364 days died due to respiratory diseases. In 2014 and 2015 in Slovenia, no new-borns died due to respiratory diseases. Studies have shown a very complicated link between level of air pollution and infant mortality due to respiratory diseases, mainly due to various external factors (allergens, cigarette smoke, diet, and lifestyle).

Neutral

Asthma has become the most common chronic disease among children and is one of the major causes of hospitalisation of children under the age of 15. In the period 1999–2004, asthma prevalence among children in the EU varied from less than 5% to over 20%. Most hospital admissions of children with asthma occur in Ljubljana and Maribor. As more and more people are sensitive to allergens, allergic diseases may increase in Europe in the coming years.

Bad

Slovenia belongs in the group of EU countries, which are more polluted due to particulate matter (PM10). The average annual concentration of PM10 is exceeding the limit value recommended for the protection of human health by the World Health Organization (20 µg PM10/m3). Very young children, including unborn babies and elderlies, are particularly sensitive to air pollutants like PM.

Neutral

Slovenia reported 1–3 waterborne outbreaks per year in the period 2006–2015. In these outbreaks, associated with drinking water, 5–263 cases were reported. In half of the outbreaks, aetiologies were unidentified, while in the other half, the following causes were identified: Cryptosporidium parvum, Escherichia coli, rotavirus, norovirus, Bacillus cereus, Campylobacter jejuni and Salmonella Typhimurium.

Neutral

In Slovenia in 2017, 94% of the population was supplied with drinking water from water supply systems that had undergone water quality monitoring in situ, at users’ taps. Drinking water monitoring excluded 6% of the Slovenian population. Generally, all residents of Slovenian cities are supplied with drinking water subjected to regular monitoring. Accessibility of drinking water did not improve significantly in the period 2004–2017.

Bad

According to the state of epiphytic lichens, the preservation of forests and air quality is poor in the entire territory of the Republic of Slovenia, except in forests at higher altitude in the Alps and partially in the Dinaric mountain range.

Neutral

In recent years, cadmium and lead concentrations in the kidneys and livers of roe deer has decreased below the level of toxic concentrations that could have a direct adverse effect on the health of the individuals of this species. Nevertheless, cadmium concentrations in the internal organs of roe deer exceed the admissible concentration determined by law in many areas of Slovenia (taking into consideration the suitability for human consumption).

Bad

Acidification of forests represents a potential danger only in the non-hydrocarbon part of Slovenia, especially in the east of the country. According to rough estimates, the critical loads occur particularly in the wider area of both major thermals (Zasavje, Celjska kotlina and Šaleška dolina). Excessive eutrophication of forests for deposition from the air does not take looming forest areas in Slovenia.

Bad

Content of metals and nitrogen are increased in the vicinity of major cities, industrial and thermal-energy centers. Increased values in western Slovenia are the result of remote transport, in northeastern Slovenia mainly due to transport and agriculture. In 2006, the nitrogen concentration were highest in Slovenia (among all the participating countries in project).