KAZALCI OKOLJA

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Neutral

In Europe 12.9 % infants die due to respiratory diseases. In 2018 and 2019 in Slovenia no newborns died due to respiratory diseases (NIJZ, 2020). Studies have shown a very complicated link between level of air pollution and infant mortality due to respiratory diseases, mainly due to various external factors (allergens, cigarette smoke, diet, lifestyle, etc.).

Neutral

Asthma is the most common chronic disease among children and one of the major causes of hospitalization to the age of fifteen. In 2019, in EU countries, the share of people reporting asthma was 5,7 %, and for Slovenia it was 4,8 %.  In the period 2016-2020, the municipalities of Kostel, Kobilje and Trzin stood out in terms of the number of hospitalizations for asthma. Children admitted to the hospital for asthma in 2021 were mostly 5 to 9 years old.

Bad

In Slovenian larger cities, in 2021, 35% of children (0-14 years old) in larger cities were exposed to concentrations of 0-20 µg PM10/m3 and 65% of children (0-14 years) in larger cities were exposed to concentrations of 20-30 µg PM10/m3. In Europe, most children live in an environment where PM10 concentrations are below 26 µg/m3.

Neutral

Slovenia reported one to three waterborne outbreaks per year during 2011–2021, except in 2015 and 2017 2020, when no outbreaks were reported. In these waterborne outbreaks, 3 to 355 cases were reported. In about half of the outbreaks, the causative agent has not been identified, while in others the following causative agents have been confirmed: Cryptosporidium parvum, Escherichia coli, rotavirus, norovirus, Bacillus cereus, Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella Typhimurium, Francisella tularensis were identified.

Neutral

In 2019, 93% of the Slovenian population used drinking water from the drinking water supply systems. This includes 858 supply zones with regular monitoring of drinking water quality at the user tap. In 2019, regular monitoring of the drinking water did not include 7% of the Slovenian population. This is because regular monitoring is not obliged for the supply systems with less than 50 people (own drinking water supply, self-sufficiency). Generally, all residents of Slovenia living in cities used regulary monitored drinking water.

Bad

According to the state of epiphytic lichens, the preservation of forests and air quality is poor in the entire territory of the Republic of Slovenia, except in forests at higher altitude in the Alps and partially in the Dinaric mountain range.

Neutral

In recent years, cadmium and lead concentrations in the kidneys and livers of roe deer has decreased below the level of toxic concentrations that could have a direct adverse effect on the health of the individuals of this species. Nevertheless, cadmium concentrations in the internal organs of roe deer exceed the admissible concentration determined by law in many areas of Slovenia (taking into consideration the suitability for human consumption).

Bad

Acidification of forests represents a potential danger only in the non-hydrocarbon part of Slovenia, especially in the east of the country. According to rough estimates, the critical loads occur particularly in the wider area of both major thermals (Zasavje, Celjska kotlina and Šaleška dolina). Excessive eutrophication of forests for deposition from the air does not take looming forest areas in Slovenia.

Neutral

Higher levels of heavy metals and nitrogen are observed around the urbanized areas, industrial regions and around thermal power plants. The reason for elevated levels at the western part of Slovenia is transboundary transport of air pollutants from the Po Valley in Italy, however at the eastern part might be transit traffic and agricultural activity. A decrease of heavy metals and nitrogen in mosses is observed in Slovenia since 1995.

Neutral

Leukemia is the most common children cancer. It represents 25 to 30% of all new diagnosed cancer cases in children younger than 15 years in the world. Causal mechanisms for the occurrence of leukemia in children are poorly known, but it is often referred connection with environmental risk factors. Data from European cancer registries indicate that the incidence rate of childhood leukemia between 1970 and 1999 grew on average by 0.7% per annum in the last twenty years has been 1% per year, mostly in countries with higher economic status (SES).


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