KAZALCI OKOLJA

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Neutral

The population trend of selected bird species is a good indicator of the long-term state of the environment. Trends in populations of selected bird species show that the state of the environment in the cultural landscape is deteriorating, while the situation in wetlands over the past few years has not changed. There is a slight decline in the populations of selected forest bird species. In recent years, populations of birds wintering along Slovenian rivers and other bodies of water are also stable. Minor fluctuations are part of natural population changes.

Neutral

Despite the country’s small surface area, species diversity in Slovenia is extremely high. The abundance among numerous plant and animal species is decreasing, with some species becoming endangered with the possibility of extinction. For example, more than four fifths of all known amphibians and reptiles in Slovenia, as well as almost half of all mammals (this represents 41 species) are on the Red List of Threatened Species.

Good

The state of wildlife in Slovenia is favourable; larger epidemics have not been identified. The number of herbivorous ungulates as well as wild boars has decreased. An increase in wildlife losses due to road kill raises concerns. The total amount of damage caused by wildlife has decreased.

Wildlife management includes all animal and plant species. Regulation of wildlife populations is based on game management plans that are submitted for adoption to the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Food by the Slovenia Forest Service in accordance with a prescribed procedure.

Neutral

Slovenia has some of the greatest subterranean biodiversity in the world. The aquatic fauna, with its 200 species, is by far the richest, while the terrestrial fauna, with 150 species, is second only to the more southern areas of the Dinaric karst. Five Slovenian cave systems have been listed among the 20 richest cave systems in the world. The Postojna-Planina Cave System, with its 50 aquatic and 35 terrestrial species is by far the most abundant. The Cave Protection Act protects the subterranean environment as a whole.

Neutral

The diversity of plant species in western Slovenia (most of the Alpine region, Slovenian submediterranean region with Kras and part of Istria) with 800 or more taxa within approximately 140 km2 (basic field of four quadrants) is considerably higher than in the central and eastern parts of Slovenia.

Neutral

The population of brown bear (Ursus arctos) in Slovenia forms part of the larger population in the Alps – the Dinaric Alps (Dinarides) and the Pindus Mountains. It is one of the largest populations of brown bear in Europe. The number of bears in this population is estimated at 2,100–2,500. The state of the population in Slovenia has been monitored by the Slovenia Forest Service since 1995 and is deemed to be favourable.

Neutral

Slovenian Environmental Agency (ARSO) is responsible for providing monetary compesation for damage caused by protected animal species. In 2018 there were 738 reported damage cases caused by protected animal species, out of which, we paid compesation for 635. A total of 301.424,80 EUR was paid in compesation, for damage caused by 23 different protected animal species. Most damage cases happened between the months of July and October, with most of the damage caused by large carnivores and most of the damage being on small livestock.

Bad

The share of present invasive species in the last decade shows an increasing trend. An increase in the share of invasive species is evident along the great rivers Sava, Mura and Drava, as well as along the Kolpa. In higher areas of Slovenia, particularly in the Alps and the Dinaric region, invasive species are very few or entirely absent. However, a notable increase in their share along the western border of the Dinaric region raises concerns.

Neutral

The population of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in Slovenian territorial waters is part of a larger population living in the northern Adriatic Sea. The state of the Slovenian population is being monitored by the Morigenos  – the Slovenian Marine Mammal Society. Throughout the year, Slovenian waters regularly host 40–100 bottlenose dolphins. Despite considerable temporal variability in density and frequence of appearance in Slovenian waters, the population trend seems to be negative and the estimated number of animals has been slightly decreasing over the years.

Bad

The conservation status of species in Slovenia indicates that only 30% of species have a favorable status. Furthermore, also the trends are unfavourable. In the years 2013-2018, the proportion of species with favorable conservation status remained stable according to the previous reporting period, while the proportion of species with poor conservation status has increased. As many as one third of Europe's important bird species have a negative or uncertain short-term trend.


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