OKOLSJKI KAZALCI

You are here

Good

The amount of waste from combustion of coal is decreasing, particularly in recent years, as a result of the decreasing use of coal for electricity generation. The largest source is the Šoštanj Thermal Power Plant. Most of the waste is used as filling material in mines.

Good

Deadwood is an important animal and plant habitat that contributes to the biodiversity of forest ecosystems. According to Slovenia Forest Service data, the volume of standing and fallen trees without stumps and branches in 2010 was 10.11m3/ha, which represented approximately 4% of the entire wood stock of forest stands. In virgin forests, however, the deadwood volume can be even several dozen times larger.

Good

In Slovenia, the number of ISO 14001 certified companies and companies registered under the EMAS standard, as well as the number of awarded eco-label flowers, has been increasing. Slovenia ranks above the EU-27 average in the number of awarded ISO 14001 certificates and eco-label flowers. Slovenia has been less successful with the EMAS standard – here, it is among the lowest ranked EU-27 countries.

 

Good

The area included in the implementation of agri-environmental measures expanded markedly after 1999, covering 254,772 ha (gross) in 2014. The proportion of the area with one or several agri-environmental measures (net area) to the total utilised agricultural area increased from 0.6% in 1999 to 39.2% in 2014. In 2015, agri-environmental measures started to be carried out in accordance with the new programme, on the gross area of 317,458 ha.

Neutral

In High Nature Value areas, agriculture can ensure a suitable level of biodiversity by means of appropriate technological solutions. Extensive management methods facilitate conservation of the diversity of species and habitats, thus helping preserve unique landscapes with rich cultural and natural heritage. According to the estimates made in Slovenia on the basis of the CORINE data on land use and data on agricultural land use, between 60% and 80% of all utilised agricultural areas in Slovenia are located in High Nature Value farmland areas.

Good

The response of agricultural holdings to agricultural policy supporting the spread of organic farming has been growing from year to year. In the period 1999–2015, the area intended for organic farming increased from 2,400 to 42,188 ha, or from 0.5 to 8.8% of total utilised agricultural area. The structure of agricultural land with organic farming is still strongly dominated by grassland (82% in 2015), which shows that the decision to undergo the transition to this type of production was primarily made by animal holdings.

Neutral

In Slovenia, gas oil used as a propellant for agricultural machinery takes up the largest part (49.6 %) of energy use in agriculture, followed by the energy for the production of mineral fertilizers (42,6 %) and electric energy (4.6 %). According to our estimates, Slovenia’s direct energy use in 2000 (energy for the production of mineral fertilizers excluded) totalled 5.9 GJ per hectare of utilised agricultural area, which is very close to the mean total energy use in the EU-15 (6.5 GJ).

Neutral

Recycling of municipal waste is increasing in Slovenia. In 2012, almost 40 per cent of municipal waste was recycled. Disposal of waste has declined over the years, 42 per cent of municipal waste was landfilled in 2012. Incineration remains minimal, at slightly above one per cent.

Bad

Quantities of hazardous waste are increasing. As hazardous waste contains substances harmful to the environment, it has to be collected, recovered or deposited separate from other waste. In 2009, 99.3 thousand tonnes of hazardous waste was generated, which was a 47% increase from 2002, while on the other hand, it was a 36% decrease from 2008, which was the year in which, due to extraordinary events, the largest quantities  of hazardous waste in recent years were generated. 47% of hazardous waste was recovered and 53% deposited in 2009.

Neutral

The export of waste from Slovenia has been increasing sharply in recent years; since 2009 (after the peak in 2008), the increase has been more than threefold. In 2015, 238 thousand tonnes of waste was exported, mostly to Austria and Hungary. The import of waste has been rather stable. In 2015, 41 thousand tonnes of waste was imported.