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Environmental indicators in Slovenia


Environmental indicators are based on graphs, maps and assessments and as such present environmental trends in Slovenia. The indicators represent one of the four pillars of our environmental reporting, and are prepared in accordance with the Environmental Protection Act. The Environmental Indicators in Slovenia website enables users to browse among 180 indicators. They are based on numerical data and they indicate the state, characteristics and trends of environmental development in Slovenia. They are prepared using a systematic approach based on data and monitoring, as shown in the information pyramid.

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Neutral

Slovenian groundwater bodies most polluted with nitrates are those with intergranular (alluvium) aquifers, particularly in north-eastern Slovenia. Groundwater in karst and fractured aquifers is less burdened with nitrates due to geographical conditions, low population density and less agricultural land. In the period 1998–2019, the average annual levels of nitrates in water bodies in the Sava valley, Ljubljansko barje, Savinja, Drava and Mura basins show a statistically significant downward trend. In other water bodies, nitrate levels are not statistically significant.

Good

Inland bathing water quality in Slovenia is good and comparable with bathing water quality in other European countries.

Good

The quality of bathing water along the Slovenian coast is excellent, which ranks Slovenia at the top among the EU countries.

Bad

Slovenian forests are over-mature, the current ratio of forest development phases is unfavourable, forest regeneration is too slow, or the areas of forests under restoration are too small to significantly change the share of forest development phases and thus ensure sustainable forest development. The role of forests as a carbon sink is at risk.

Neutral

Most Slovenian forests are still undergoing natural regeneration, which guarantees the stability of future forest stands and adaptation to the changing site conditions caused by climate change. Restoration by planting seedlings and sowing (artificial regeneration) only complements natural regeneration when disturbances occur in the process of the natural regeneration of the forest, e.g. where there is no possibility of natural seeding, with the risk of developing erosion processes on exposed forest areas (e.g.


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