KAZALCI OKOLJA

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Greenhouse gas emissions in 2007 amounted to 20,722 kilotons CO2 equivalent, which is 1.8% above the base year. In accordance with Slovenia's commitment to achieve an 8% reduction in its emissions, an average emission of greenhouse gasses in the 2008-2012 period should not exceed 18,726 kilotons CO2 equivalent.


The indicator shows the movement of the total quantity of greenhouse gas emissions in Slovenia and the main categories of sources. The calculations are based on the IPCC methodology (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change). Based on the Slovenian ratification of the Kyoto Protocol, which requires an 8% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions in the 2008-2012 period in comparison to the base year (1986), the indicator also monitors the movement of the global quantity of greenhouse gasses and offers comparison with the EU-15 and the EU-27 countries. In accordance with the international agreements, emissions in the base year are the sum of CO2(carbon dioxide), CH4(methane) and N2O (nitrous oxide) emissions in 1986 and emissions of F-gasses (HFC - hydrofluorocarbons, PFC - perfluorocarbons and SF6- sulphur hexafluoride) in 1995. Emissions in the base year were determined on the basis of the situation recorded in the emission records in July 2007.


Charts

Figure PS03-1: Annual greenhouse gases emissions by sectors
Sources: 

GHG Archives, Environmental Agency of the Republic of Slovenia, April 2008

Show data
base year 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998
Austria Tg CO2 equiv. 79 78 82 76 76 76 80 83 82 82
Belgium Tg CO2 equiv. 146 143 146 143 142 148 150 154 145 151
Denmark Tg CO2 equiv. 69 69 80 73 76 79 76 90 80 76
Finland Tg CO2 equiv. 71 70 68 67 69 74 71 77 75 72
France Tg CO2 equiv. 564 563 587 579 553 548 557 572 565 578
Germany Tg CO2 equiv. 1232 1232 1186 1135 1124 1105 1101 1122 1084 1060
Greece Tg CO2 equiv. 107 103 103 104 103 106 108 111 116 121
Ireland Tg CO2 equiv. 56 55 56 56 56 57 58 60 62 65
Italy Tg CO2 equiv. 517 517 518 516 510 502 529 522 528 539
Luxembourg Tg CO2 equiv. 13 13 14 13 13 13 10 10 10 9
Netherlands Tg CO2 equiv. 213 212 217 216 221 221 225 233 226 227
Portugal Tg CO2 equiv. 60 59 61 65 64 66 70 68 71 76
Spain Tg CO2 equiv. 290 285 292 299 287 303 315 308 328 339
Sweden Tg CO2 equiv. 72 72 73 73 72 75 74 78 73 74
United Kingdom Tg CO2 equiv. 776 772 779 754 733 722 712 733 708 703
EU-15 Tg CO2 equiv. 4266 4245 4260 4168 4100 4096 4137 4220 4154 4171
Bulgaria Tg CO2 equiv. 133 117 96 87 87 85 89 87 84 75
Cyprus Tg CO2 equiv. / 5 6 6 7 7 7 7 7 8
Czech Republic Tg CO2 equiv. 194 195 182 165 159 149 154 160 153 145
Estonia Tg CO2 equiv. 43 41 38 28 22 23 21 22 21 20
Hungary Tg CO2 equiv. 115 97 89 80 81 80 79 81 79 79
Latvia Tg CO2 equiv. 26 27 25 20 16 14 13 13 12 12
Lithuania Tg CO2 equiv. 49 50 51 30 24 23 22 23 23 24
Malta Tg CO2 equiv. / 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
Poland Tg CO2 equiv. 563 453 445 432 439 434 440 449 444 414
Romania Tg CO2 equiv. 278 242 191 181 179 174 180 187 168 150
Slovakia Tg CO2 equiv. 72 74 66 62 56 54 53 52 51 51
Slovenia Tg CO2 equiv. 20 18 17 17 17 18 18 19 19 19
EU-27 Tg CO2 equiv. / 5567 5468 5278 5189 5159 5215 5321 5217 5169
Austria index (base y. = 100) 100 99 104 96 96 97 101 105 104 104
Belgium index (base y. = 100) 100 98 100 98 98 101 103 105 100 103
Denmark index (base y. = 100) 100 99 115 106 109 114 110 130 115 109
Finland index (base y. = 100) 100 99 96 94 97 105 100 108 106 101
France index (base y. = 100) 100 100 104 103 98 97 99 101 100 103
Germany index (base y. = 100) 100 100 96 92 91 90 89 91 88 86
Greece index (base y. = 100) 100 97 96 97 97 99 101 104 108 113
Ireland index (base y. = 100) 100 99 100 100 101 103 105 109 111 116
Italy index (base y. = 100) 100 100 100 100 99 97 102 101 102 104
Luxembourg index (base y. = 100) 100 100 103 102 102 96 79 79 74 68
Netherlands index (base y. = 100) 100 100 102 101 104 104 105 109 106 107
Portugal index (base y. = 100) 100 99 102 109 106 109 116 112 118 126
Spain index (base y. = 100) 100 98 101 103 99 105 109 106 113 117
Sweden index (base y. = 100) 100 100 101 100 100 104 103 108 101 102
United Kingdom index (base y. = 100) 100 99 100 97 94 93 92 94 91 91
EU-15 index (base y. = 100) 100 100 100 98 96 96 97 99 97 98
Bulgaria index (base y. = 100) 100 88 72 65 66 64 67 66 63 56
Czech Republic index (base y. = 100) 100 100 94 85 82 77 79 82 79 75
Estonia index (base y. = 100) 100 96 89 66 51 53 49 51 50 46
Hungary index (base y. = 100) 100 84 77 70 70 70 68 70 68 68
Latvia index (base y. = 100) 100 103 96 77 62 55 49 49 47 45
Lithuania index (base y. = 100) 100 101 103 61 49 46 44 47 46 48
Poland index (base y. = 100) 100 80 79 77 78 77 78 80 79 73
Romania index (base y. = 100) 100 87 69 65 64 62 65 67 60 54
Slovakia index (base y. = 100) 100 103 92 85 78 75 74 72 70 71
Slovenia index (base y. = 100) 100 91 85 85 86 86 91 94 96 94
EU-15 target index (base y. = 100)
1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
Austria Tg CO2 equiv. 80 80 85 86 92 91 93 90 87 87
Belgium Tg CO2 equiv. 144 145 144 143 145 145 141 136 130 133
Denmark Tg CO2 equiv. 73 68 70 69 74 68 64 72 67 64
Finland Tg CO2 equiv. 71 69 74 76 84 80 68 80 78 70
France Tg CO2 equiv. 562 557 559 550 554 553 556 540 530 527
Germany Tg CO2 equiv. 1027 1025 1041 1020 1014 1000 978 983 957 958
Greece Tg CO2 equiv. 121 125 126 126 130 130 133 129 132 127
Ireland Tg CO2 equiv. 66 68 70 68 68 67 69 68 68 67
Italy Tg CO2 equiv. 546 550 555 556 571 574 573 562 553 541
Luxembourg Tg CO2 equiv. 9 10 10 11 12 13 13 13 13 12
Netherlands Tg CO2 equiv. 215 215 216 216 217 218 212 209 207 207
Portugal Tg CO2 equiv. 83 81 83 87 82 85 87 82 80 78
Spain Tg CO2 equiv. 367 381 381 397 405 420 435 427 439 406
Sweden Tg CO2 equiv. 70 69 69 70 71 70 68 67 66 64
United Kingdom Tg CO2 equiv. 671 673 676 655 661 659 655 650 640 628
EU-15 Tg CO2 equiv. 4106 4114 4159 4131 4178 4174 4145 4108 4046 3970
Bulgaria Tg CO2 equiv. 70 69 70 67 72 71 71 72 76 73
Cyprus Tg CO2 equiv. 9 9 9 9 9 9 10 10 10 10
Czech Republic Tg CO2 equiv. 141 148 150 145 145 146 145 147 147 141
Estonia Tg CO2 equiv. 18 18 19 18 20 20 19 19 22 20
Hungary Tg CO2 equiv. 79 77 79 77 80 79 80 78 76 73
Latvia Tg CO2 equiv. 11 10 11 11 11 11 11 12 12 12
Lithuania Tg CO2 equiv. 21 19 21 21 21 22 23 24 25 24
Malta Tg CO2 equiv. 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
Poland Tg CO2 equiv. 402 390 387 374 386 387 390 403 400 396
Romania Tg CO2 equiv. 133 136 141 147 154 155 150 154 153 146
Slovakia Tg CO2 equiv. 50 49 51 50 51 51 50 50 48 49
Slovenia Tg CO2 equiv. 19 19 20 20 20 20 20 20 21 21
EU-27 Tg CO2 equiv. 5060 5062 5117 5072 5149 5148 5117 5100 5039 4940
Austria index (base y. = 100) 102 102 107 109 116 115 118 113 110 110
Belgium index (base y. = 100) 99 99 99 98 100 100 97 93 89 91
Denmark index (base y. = 100) 105 99 101 99 107 98 92 103 96 92
Finland index (base y. = 100) 100 97 105 108 119 113 96 112 110 99
France index (base y. = 100) 100 99 99 97 98 98 99 96 94 93
Germany index (base y. = 100) 83 83 84 83 82 81 79 80 78 78
Greece index (base y. = 100) 113 117 118 118 121 121 124 120 123 119
Ireland index (base y. = 100) 119 122 125 122 121 121 124 123 122 121
Italy index (base y. = 100) 106 106 107 108 110 111 111 109 107 105
Luxembourg index (base y. = 100) 71 75 78 86 89 100 101 100 97 95
Netherlands index (base y. = 100) 101 101 101 101 102 102 100 98 97 97
Portugal index (base y. = 100) 139 135 138 145 137 141 144 137 133 130
Spain index (base y. = 100) 127 131 131 137 140 145 150 147 151 140
Sweden index (base y. = 100) 98 95 96 97 98 98 94 93 92 89
United Kingdom index (base y. = 100) 86 87 87 84 85 85 84 84 82 81
EU-15 index (base y. = 100) 96 96 97 97 98 98 97 96 95 93
Bulgaria index (base y. = 100) 52 52 53 50 54 54 53 54 57 55
Czech Republic index (base y. = 100) 73 76 77 75 74 75 75 76 76 73
Estonia index (base y. = 100) 43 43 43 42 46 47 46 44 52 48
Hungary index (base y. = 100) 68 67 69 67 69 69 69 68 66 63
Latvia index (base y. = 100) 42 39 42 42 42 43 44 45 47 46
Lithuania index (base y. = 100) 42 39 42 42 43 44 46 48 52 49
Poland index (base y. = 100) 71 69 69 66 68 69 69 72 71 70
Romania index (base y. = 100) 48 49 51 53 55 56 54 55 55 52
Slovakia index (base y. = 100) 70 68 70 69 71 70 70 69 66 68
Slovenia index (base y. = 100) 91 92 97 98 96 98 99 100 101 105
EU-15 target index (base y. = 100)
2009 - EU-15 target
Austria Tg CO2 equiv. 80
Belgium Tg CO2 equiv. 124
Denmark Tg CO2 equiv. 61
Finland Tg CO2 equiv. 66
France Tg CO2 equiv. 517
Germany Tg CO2 equiv. 920
Greece Tg CO2 equiv. 123
Ireland Tg CO2 equiv. 62
Italy Tg CO2 equiv. 491
Luxembourg Tg CO2 equiv. 12
Netherlands Tg CO2 equiv. 199
Portugal Tg CO2 equiv. 75
Spain Tg CO2 equiv. 368
Sweden Tg CO2 equiv. 60
United Kingdom Tg CO2 equiv. 566
EU-15 Tg CO2 equiv. 3724
Bulgaria Tg CO2 equiv. 59
Cyprus Tg CO2 equiv. 9
Czech Republic Tg CO2 equiv. 133
Estonia Tg CO2 equiv. 17
Hungary Tg CO2 equiv. 67
Latvia Tg CO2 equiv. 11
Lithuania Tg CO2 equiv. 22
Malta Tg CO2 equiv. 3
Poland Tg CO2 equiv. 377
Romania Tg CO2 equiv. 131
Slovakia Tg CO2 equiv. 43
Slovenia Tg CO2 equiv. 19
EU-27 Tg CO2 equiv. 4615
Austria index (base y. = 100) 101
Belgium index (base y. = 100) 85
Denmark index (base y. = 100) 88
Finland index (base y. = 100) 93
France index (base y. = 100) 92
Germany index (base y. = 100) 75
Greece index (base y. = 100) 115
Ireland index (base y. = 100) 112
Italy index (base y. = 100) 95
Luxembourg index (base y. = 100) 89
Netherlands index (base y. = 100) 93
Portugal index (base y. = 100) 124
Spain index (base y. = 100) 127
Sweden index (base y. = 100) 83
United Kingdom index (base y. = 100) 73
EU-15 index (base y. = 100) 87
Bulgaria index (base y. = 100) 45
Czech Republic index (base y. = 100) 68
Estonia index (base y. = 100) 40
Hungary index (base y. = 100) 58
Latvia index (base y. = 100) 41
Lithuania index (base y. = 100) 44
Poland index (base y. = 100) 67
Romania index (base y. = 100) 47
Slovakia index (base y. = 100) 60
Slovenia index (base y. = 100) 95
EU-15 target index (base y. = 100) 92
Figure PS03-2: Movement of greenhouse gas emissions in the 1990-2007 period for Slovenia, EU-15 and EU-27 (the data does not include land-use, land-use change and forestry)
Sources: 

EEA Technical Report 7/2007, Annual European Community Greenhousegas Inventory 1990-2005 and inventory report 2007; GHG Archives, Environmenmtal Agency of the Republic of Slovenia, April 2008.

Show data
base year 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994
CO2 1000 t CO2 equiv. 16282 16287 15734 15454 15393 14738 13758 13675 14041 14172
CH4 1000 t CO2 equiv. 2376 2263 2254 2237 2243 2203 2113 2180 2107 2100
N2O 1000 t CO2 equiv. 1370 1391 1407 1350 1292 1270 1188 1282 1186 1214
F-plini 1000 t CO2 equiv. 326 287 328 230 261 268 313 117 117 117
- HFC 1000 t CO2 equiv. 29 np np np np np np np np np
- PFC 1000 t CO2 equiv. 286 276 318 220 250 257 303 107 106 105
- SF6 1000 t CO2 equiv. 12 10 10 10 11 10 10 10 11 11
total 1000 t CO2 equiv. 20354 20228 19722 19271 19189 18478 17372 17253 17452 17603
1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004
CO2 1000 t CO2 equiv. 14989 15660 15970 15701 15071 15177 16094 16240 15991 16344
CH4 1000 t CO2 equiv. 2092 2053 2075 2112 2089 2187 2148 2236 2198 2147
N2O 1000 t CO2 equiv. 1230 1233 1261 1275 1272 1307 1282 1298 1249 1196
F-plini 1000 t CO2 equiv. 151 145 154 148 149 161 176 207 238 262
- HFC 1000 t CO2 equiv. 32 30 35 32 28 40 54 73 101 124
- PFC 1000 t CO2 equiv. 106 102 105 102 105 106 106 116 119 120
- SF6 1000 t CO2 equiv. 13 13 14 13 16 16 16 17 18 18
total 1000 t CO2 equiv. 18461 19091 19460 19235 18582 18832 19700 19982 19677 19949
2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
CO2 1000 t CO2 equiv. 16639 16821 16947 17920 16019
CH4 1000 t CO2 equiv. 2155 2176 2180 2060 2016
N2O 1000 t CO2 equiv. 1205 1219 1223 1153 1162
F-plini 1000 t CO2 equiv. 300 311 297 233 239
- HFC 1000 t CO2 equiv. 148 169 189 196 217
- PFC 1000 t CO2 equiv. 133 125 91 21 7
- SF6 1000 t CO2 equiv. 19 18 17 16 14
total 1000 t CO2 equiv. 20298 20527 20646 21366 19436
Figure PS03-3: Greenhouse gas emissions by main category of gasses
Sources: 

GHG Archives, Environmental Agency of the Republic of Slovenia, April, 2008

Show data
base year 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994
transport 1000 t CO2 equiv. 2008 2040 2332 2512 2545 2749 2597 2679 3097 3419
energy industries 1000 t CO2 equiv. 6729 6729 6376 6459 6565 6265 5345 5867 5645 5255
industrial processes 1000 t CO2 equiv. 1328 1289 1314 1290 1282 1292 1177 907 769 922
fuels in manufacturing industries and construction 1000 t CO2 equiv. 4406 4404 3902 3674 3446 3119 3057 2663 2503 2665
fuels in residential and commercial sectors 1000 t CO2 equiv. 2366 2363 2384 1976 2027 1808 2126 1886 2368 2275
agriculture 1000 t CO2 equiv. 2334 2218 2250 2196 2142 2140 2007 2184 2044 2058
waste 1000 t CO2 equiv. 566 567 578 589 605 603 592 572 573 580
other 1000 t CO2 equiv. 618 618 586 574 577 503 470 496 451 430
total 1000 t CO2 equiv. 20354 20228 19722 19271 19189 18478 17372 17253 17452 17603
1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004
transport 1000 t CO2 equiv. 3757 4350 4412 3806 3618 3763 3891 3896 4030 4171
energy industries 1000 t CO2 equiv. 5627 5237 5650 5885 5194 5498 6203 6452 6184 6314
industrial processes 1000 t CO2 equiv. 964 963 992 973 988 1015 1094 1111 1189 1239
fuels in manufacturing industries and construction 1000 t CO2 equiv. 2615 2478 2220 2286 2297 2269 2211 2244 2158 2276
fuels in residential and commercial sectors 1000 t CO2 equiv. 2437 3060 3131 3161 3376 3050 3120 2974 2893 2827
agriculture 1000 t CO2 equiv. 2046 1998 2001 2049 2032 2137 2109 2179 2085 1992
waste 1000 t CO2 equiv. 585 590 619 638 663 683 690 703 709 701
other 1000 t CO2 equiv. 430 415 435 436 415 417 383 422 428 430
total 1000 t CO2 equiv. 18461 19091 19460 19235 18582 18832 19700 19982 19677 19949
2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
transport 1000 t CO2 equiv. 4442 4652 5227 6152 5337
energy industries 1000 t CO2 equiv. 6325 6379 6596 6388 6085
industrial processes 1000 t CO2 equiv. 1342 1394 1400 1281 938
fuels in manufacturing industries and construction 1000 t CO2 equiv. 2486 2593 2346 2305 1918
fuels in residential and commercial sectors 1000 t CO2 equiv. 2571 2344 1896 2259 2184
agriculture 1000 t CO2 equiv. 2006 2023 2078 1965 1996
waste 1000 t CO2 equiv. 713 729 692 619 584
other 1000 t CO2 equiv. 413 412 410 398 393
total 1000 t CO2 equiv. 20298 20527 20646 21366 19436
Figure PS03-4: Overview of measures for attaining the Kyoto Protocol objectives

Goals

An 8% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions in the period of 2008-2012 with respect to the value as identified in the base year (1986), among others, by attaining the following area goals:
• 12% share of renewable energy sources in the primary energy balance by 2010
• 25% share of renewable energy sources in heat supply by 2010
• 33.6% share of electricity from renewable sources by 2010
• 7.5% share of biofuel in traffic by 2015
• 9% cumulative end energy savings in the 2008-2016 period
• 10% increase in the efficiency of energy use in the industry and service sector by 2010 in comparison to 2004
• 10% increase in the efficiency of energy use in buildings by 2010 compared to 2004
• 15% increase in the efficiency of energy use in the public sector by 2010 compared to 2004
• 10% increase in the efficiency of energy use in traffic by 2010 compared to 2004
• Doubling the share of electricity from cogeneration from 800 GWh in 2000 to 1,600 GWh in 2010


The greatest contributor among the emissions of greenhouse gases in 2007 was carbon dioxide – CO2 (82.0 %), which results mainly from fuel combustion; the second largest contributor was methane (10.5 %), mostly deriving from wastes and agriculture, and third was nitrous oxide – N2O (6.4%), deriving from agriculture as well. Traffic-related N2O emissions have also been observed. Emissions of F-gases, which include hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs) and sulphur hexafluoride (SF6), are very small (1.1%), but due to high greenhouse potential, their contribution to global warming is far from insignificant.

Emissions of greenhouse gasses in 2007 amounted to 20.722 Gg (gigagram=1000 tons or kilotons) CO2 equivalent. This is 1.9% above the value in the base year. The quantity of emissions in the base year was finally determined in 2007 for all the signatories of the Kyoto Protocol and can no longer be changed. For Slovenia, the total quantity of emissions in the base year is calculated as the sum of CO2, CH4 and N2O emissions in 1986, and emission of F-gasses in 1995, which amounts to 20,354.042 Gg CO2 equivalent. In accordance with the obligation from the Kyoto Protocol, which requires an 8% reduction in emissions, average emissions in the 2008-2012 period in Slovenia should not exceed 18.725,719 kt CO2 equivalent.

In order to fulfil the obligations arising from the Kyoto Protocol, it was therefore necessary to introduce additional measures to help us achieve the prescribed value. The majority of them are described in the Operational Programme for the Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions, which was adopted by the Government of the Republic of Slovenia in 2006. For the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in the area of energy production and consumption, the Energy Act was adopted in 1999, and the National Energy Programme (NEP) was drawn up as well. Both of these documents envisage a sustainability-oriented development of the energy sector by enhancing the effectiveness of energy as well as using renewable energy sources. The table below presents these measures. In 2005, one of the three most essential Kyoto mechanisms began functioning, i.e. trade in greenhouse gas emissions. In 2008, 98 installation operators from Slovenia were included in the trading system. In the EU, emission trading was introduced in 2005; at the global level, it is to be introduced in the 2008-2012 period. Another additional measure in the traffic sector is the implementation of measures from the Transport Policy Resolution, which envisage rerouting the transit from roads to railways.

Although total emissions have not changed significantly in comparison with the base year, there is a considerable change in their distribution by sector. The highest increase in emissions in period 1986-2007, a 175% rise, occurred in traffic emissions. Due to road traffic, the total amount of greenhouse gas emissions has been increasing by more than one per cent a year, which diminishes our efforts to curb greenhouse gas emissions in all other sectors. A greater amount of emissions from traffic is mainly the result of economic growth in Slovenia as well as in the wider region. The growth of emissions due to transit through Slovenia, which rose substantially after the country entered the EU, has also been observed.

In light of the loss of the Yugoslav markets, abandonment of non-profitable production and increase in productivity, the manufacturing industries contributed the largest share towards curbing greenhouse gas emissions. The decrease occurred both in emissions arising from fuel consumption and processing emissions. For the purposes of maintaining competitiveness, trade in emissions and the IPPC Directive, the industrial sector is encouraged to make use of the currently best available technology (BAT). The IPPC Directive on integrated pollution prevention and control requires the EU Member Countries to issue permits for process installations in all industry sectors. Integrated pollution prevention means the reduction of emissions into the air, water and soil, rational use of raw-materials, reduction of noise, and greater energy efficiency.

Lower emissions than those in the base year are also noticed within the agricultural sector, which is mostly a result of reduction in the number of livestock units. The future projections anticipate that the number of cattle will again rise due to quotas determined for Slovenia. On the other hand, agricultural policy will, by introducing good agricultural practice in fertilising and establishing biogas consumption for electricity and heating production, influence the reduction in agricultural emissions.

Forests cover more than 58% of Slovenia’s land surface and constitute an important source of reducing GHG emissions. Calculations of CO2 sinks are considerable due to land use change and forestry. In 2007, CO2 sinks reached 5,774 Gg of CO2, exceeding a much lower permitted level. On the basis of the condition stipulating that these sinks must be a direct result of human activity so that the state may use them for the purposes of fulfilling its obligations, an assessment was selected according to which it will be possible to make use of at least 1,320 Gg of CO2 during the period of 2008-2012.


Data for Slovenia

Objectives summarized by: Resolution on National Environmental Action Programme 2005-2012 (ReNPVO, Official Gazette of the RS, No. 2/06).
Source database or source: GHG Inventory. GHG Archives.Environmental Agency of the Republic of Slovenia.
Data administrator: Environmental Agency of the Republic of Slovenia, Tajda Mekinda Majaron.
Data acquisition date for this indicator: 29 May 2009
Methodology and frequency of data collection for the indicator: The data is presented for the 1986-2007 period.
The majority of input data for the calculation of emissions was collected from the Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia database. This data contains mainly information on fuel consumption and the associated calorific value and data from the agricultural sector (livestock numbers, output quantity and use of fertilisers). Data on vehicle fleet and the number of kilometres driven for the calculation of emissions from road traffic was obtained from the Ministry of the Interior of the RS and the Slovenian Roads Agency. Other input data was collected from the Environmental Agency of the RS databases. This is mainly the data on emissions trade and solid waste management. To a lesser extent, data was also obtained on the basis of individual agreements with producers or consumers. Data is collected annually and can be updated for past years when necessary.

Data processing methodology: Greenhouse gas emissions are calculated on the basis of IPCC methodology, developed under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. Greenhouse gas inventories data was prepared on the basis of the IPCC methodology (IPCC 1996, 2000). Bearing in mind the importance of the source and available data, various approaches were used (Tier) within the IPCC methodology. To evaluate emissions from fuel consumption, national emission factors were taken into account for CO2 emissions from domestic lignite and natural gas, whereas adopted IPCC emission factors were used for other fuels. Emissions from road traffic were calculated by using the Copert III model.
In fugitive CO2 emissions in the energy sector, emissions released in the desulphurisation of flue gasses in thermal power plants were considered.
These emissions were calculated on the basis of information on the use of carbonate. Emission factors for fugitive CO2 and CH4emissions in mining were determined on the basis of measurements in the Slovenian coal mines. CH4 emissions in the transfer of natural gas were calculated on the basis of data from the company that uses a transmission and distribution network. Losses in distribution were estimated on the basis of the length of individual types of pipelines in relation to the type of pipeline by using specific losses per unit of length, as mentioned in the German report to the Conference of the Parties, which makes sense if we consider the level of maintenance and the low average age of the pipeline network. Industrial process emissions were mainly determined on the basis of data that was obtained directly from producers or through emissions trading and by using national emission factors. Methane emissions due to intestinal fermentation in cattle were especially precisely determined in the agricultural sector. A more precise approach was used to calculate emissions from animal manure in pig and cattle production. The Tier 1 approach was used when calculating methane emissions from the keeping of other animals, which produce less methane emissions. When calculating N2O emissions from manure and direct emissions due to fertilisation with animal manure, input data was used, which was obtained from methane emissions estimates. Adopted IPCC factors, which determine the transformation of nitrogen into N2O, were used when calculating N2O emissions. Methane emissions from solid waste management were determined with the use of the first-order method, which takes into account the time dynamics of methane release. N2O emissions from wastewater were determined on the basis of protein use in human consumption, which did not change according to the estimates during the period in question.
Information concerning data quality:
- Advantages and advantages of the indicator: The correctness of calculations and the appropriate use of information is monitored by the Convention Secretariat with annual revision reports. Data flow is in accordance with the requirements of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, the Kyoto Protocol, and the relevant European legislation (Decision No. 280/2004/EC of the European Parliament and the Council concerning a mechanism for monitoring Community greenhouse gas emissions and for implementing the Kyoto Protocol, and Commission Decision 2005/166/EC laying down rules implementing the previous Decision 280/2004/EC).
- Relevance, accuracy, robustness, uncertainty:
Emission calculations from the field of fuel consumption and partly from industrial processes are relatively precise, whereas estimates from the agricultural sector are significantly less reliable due to the nature of the process itself. The total unreliability of greenhouse gas emissions calculations in the base year (1986) was 8.5%, and 7.3% in 2007.
Reliability of the indicator (archive data): /
Overall estimate (1 = no major remarks, 3 = data with reservation):
Relevance: 1
Accuracy: 1
Completeness over time:1
Completeness over space: 1

Data for Europe:

Source database or source: Data for the EU-15 and EU-27 is taken from the technical report of the European Environment Agency, No. 4/2009 (Annual European Community greenhouse gas inventory 1990-2007 and inventory report 2009). http://www.eea.europa.eu/publications/european-community-greenhouse-gas-inventory-2009..
Data administrator: EEA
Data acquisition date for this indicator: 29 May 2009
Methodology and frequency of data collection for the indicator: The data is presented for the 1990-2007 period. European greenhouse gas inventories are calculated as the sum of emissions of all Member States and are presented separately for the EU-15 and the EU-27. Data is updated once a year for the entire 1990-2007 period.
Data processing methodology: Greenhouse gas emissions are calculated in a similar manner in each Member State, as the states must use one of the IPCC methodologies.
Information concerning data quality:
- Advantages and disadvantages of the indicator: The correctness of calculations and the appropriate use of data is monitored by the Convention Secretariat with annual revisions of Member State reports and the Community report. Data flow is in accordance with the requirements of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, the Kyoto Protocol, and the relevant European legislation (Decision No. 280/2004/EC of the European Parliament and the Council concerning a mechanism for monitoring Community greenhouse gas emissions and for implementing the Kyoto Protocol, and Commission Decision 2005/166/EC laying down rules implementing the previous Decision 280/2004/EC.
- Relevance, accuracy, robustness, uncertainty:
Reliability of the indicator (archive data): /
-Overall estimate (1 = no major remarks, 3 = data with reservation):
Relevance: 1
Accuracy: 1
Completeness over time:1
Completeness over space: 1


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