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Although the annual number of road transport fatalities in Slovenia has been decreasing for decades and has almost halved in the last 20 years, it is still too high – traffic accidents in the last ten years took around 300 lives annually. Of major concern is also the recent increase in the number of these accidents and injured persons, since the number of both has almost doubled in the last decade due to the extreme increase in transport.


The indicator defines the number of traffic accidents, fatalities and injuries in road transport for the period 1991-2007 in Slovenia and in other EU countries. This includes all traffic accidents in road transport, in the inspection of which the police cooperated and which occurred in the current year. Fatalities are all persons killed outright or within 30 days as a result of the accident. Injured persons are all persons not killed, but injured in an accident and who usually needed medical treatment (CARE, 2009). Accidents in rail, maritime and air transport are not included due to their minimum share.


Charts

Figure PR10-1: Development of the number of traffic accidents, fatalities and injuries in Slovenia
Sources: 

Road safety evolution in EU. CARE – European Road Accident Database, European Commission, 2009.

Show data
1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000
accidents index (1970 = 100) 100 106 115 120 120 114 127 107 128 157
fatalities index (1970 = 100) 100 107 107 109 90 84 77 67 72 68
injured index (1970 = 100) 100 105 112 114 115 115 125 106 129 167
accidents number 5479 5781 6290 6552 6567 6273 6973 5874 7009 8584
fatalities number 462 493 493 505 415 389 357 309 334 313
injured number 6938 7254 7762 7882 8001 8001 8675 7374 8980 11574
2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007
accidents index (1970 = 100) 168 187 216 232 192 212 208
fatalities index (1970 = 100) 60 58 52 59 56 57 63
injured index (1970 = 100) 183 208 244 270 211 237 249
accidents number 9198 10266 11815 12721 10509 11620 11414
fatalities number 278 269 242 274 258 262 292
injured number 12673 14404 16898 18723 14607 16467 17294
Figure PR10-2: Changes in the number of traffic accidents, fatalities and injuries in European countries in the period 1991–2007
Sources: 

Road safety evolution in EU. CARE – European Road Accident Database, European Commission, 2009.

Show data
Portugal Estonia Latvia Spain France Germany Austria Netherlands EU-27 Belgium
accidents % -28 27 12 2 -45 -13 -8 -37 -11 -14
fatalities % -70 -60 -58 -57 -56 -55 -55 -45 -44 -43
injured % -33 53 34 -4 -50 -15 7 -58 -11 -29
Hungary Finland Luxembourg Sweden Italy Slovenia United Kingdom Denmark Lithuania Poland
accidents % -16 -29 -17 16 35 108 -23 -37 9 -8
fatalities % -42 -40 -39 -37 -37 -37 -36 -33 -32 -29
injured % -16 -27 -21 27 35 149 -20 -35 21 -3
Malta Ireland Greece Cyprus Bolgaria Romania Czech Republic Slovakia
accidents % / -15 -25 / 64 -5 7 /
fatalities % -25 -24 -24 -14 -10 -9 -8 2
injured % 101 -13 -32 -48 90 -10 6 17

Goals

- Reduction of the number of fatalities in traffic accidents to 124 victims by the end of 2011, which would save approximately 600 lives in the period 2007-2011 (Resolution on National Programme on Road Traffic Safety 2007–2011).
- Increase of road traffic safety with the accelerated construction of the motorway network and bypasses, non-level crossings of traffic routes, improvement of the vehicle fleet, education of drivers and their awareness as well as stricter monitoring of traffic violations (Operational Programme of Environmental and Transport Infrastructure Development for the Period 2007–2013.
- Improvement of safety in rail transport, with an emphasis on the improvement of traffic culture of participants and better protection or elimination of level crossings of roads with railways (Operational Programme of Environmental and Transport Infrastructure Development for the Period 2007–2013.


In the countries of the EU, 137 road transport participants died per million residents in 1995. In the same year in Slovenia, 208 road transport participants died, by which Slovenia exceeded the European average by 52 %. According to this criterion, Slovenia belonged in 1995 to the least safe European countries. In the last ten years, the number of fatalities on our roads has slightly decreased (in 2007, 145 fatalities per million residents). However, Slovenia is still exceeding the EU average by 69 %; in the EU, 86 persons died in road transport per million residents.

The objectives and measures for the particularly pressing transport subsystem are for the period 2007-2011 stipulated in the Resolution on National Programme on Road Traffic Safety (OG RS, no. 2/2007). The resolution has established that road safety in Slovenia has been unacceptable and unsatisfactory for a long time, and has been strongly reducing the quality of life in our society and of its members. In the period 1995-2007 in Slovenia, almost 3600 persons died due to traffic accidents. As an answer to this problem, the resolution is following the example of other European countries and setting to the foreground the vision »zero«, which represents a positive and responsible relationship of the creators and participants of the road-transport system who are, with their comprehensive operations and management, obliged to prevent the worst consequences of traffic accidents and provide a safe long-term objective: zero fatalities and zero seriously injured persons due to traffic accidents. The main objective of the programme is to keep the number of fatalities in traffic accidents in 2011 under 124. Considering the trends in recent years, when on average less people died in traffic accidents with regard to previous years, this would save approximately 600 lives by 2011. The resolution is considering five of the most exposed categories of road transport participants – pedestrians, cyclists, young drivers of passenger cars (15-24 years), elderly drivers of passenger cars (above 65) and drivers of motorcycles, who are primarily considered to be possible victims of traffic accidents. Besides the five most endangered groups of road transport participants, the Resolution draws attention to two of the most frequent causes for traffic accidents – speed and alcohol or illegal drugs and other psychoactive substances. Despite the decrease in the number of fatalities in road transport, the number of traffic accidents and injured in Slovenia, including the social costs, has been increasing above average. The annual number of traffic accidents resulting in injured people has, after 1995, increased by 78 % or 100 % respectively. There are different causes for this problem, although the majority of them come from above-average motorisation and an increase in road motor transport as well as the abandonment of safer transport modes (especially public transport).

The European Environment Agency explains the causes of such trends (less victims and more accidents and injured) in new EU Member States (EEA, 2005):
- with improved technologies of newer vehicles and their higher safety standards;
- with higher road quality, their engineering and road signalisation;
- with legislative changes in connection with driving under the influence of alcohol;
- with the introduction and implementation of stricter speed limits.

The European Commission has also been dealing a lot with road-transport safety. In 2003, it presented a new Road Safety Action Programme, which contains three main areas of action (EEA, 2005):
- encouraging road users to more responsible behaviour, especially through stricter compliance with the existing legislation, having continuous training for private and commercial drivers, and more efficient persecution of dangerous behaviour (driving under the influence of alcohol and drugs); improving police checks and promoting education and road user awareness campaigns.
- making use of the technological progress of the safety of vehicles with the improvement of safety standards;
- encouraging improvements in road infrastructure, especially by determining and spreading the examples of the best practice and eliminating accident black spots.


Data for Slovenia and other countries:

Objectives summarised by: Resolution on National Programme on Road Traffic Safety 2007–2011, OG RS, no. 2/2007 and Operational Programme of Environmental and Transport Infrastructure Development for the Period 2007–2013.
Source database or source: Road safety evolution in EU, CARE – European Road Accident Database (17 July 2009).
Data administrator: European Commission, Directorate-General for Energy and Transport.
Date of acquisition for this indicator: 17 July 2009.
Methodology and frequency of data collection for the indicator: The data is updated on an annual basis.
Data processing methodology: /
Information concerning data quality:
- Advantages and disadvantages (at data level): Due to different definitions of traffic accidents, fatalities and injuries in road transport in individual countries and the application correction factors for this, the comparability of data sources can be questionable sometimes.
- Relevance, accuracy, robustness, uncertainty: The data can be considered as quite accurate and reliable.
Reliability of the indicator (archive data): The data refers to a longer time period.
Uncertainty of the indicator (scenarios/projections): Projections have not been prepared.
- Overall assessment (1 = no major comments, 3 = data to be considered with reservation): 1
Relevance: 1
Accuracy: 1
Completeness over time: 1
Completeness over space: 2 (definitions of traffic accidents, fatalities and injuries in road transport are slightly different in various countries)

Other sources and literature:
- EEA, 2005. TERM 2005 09 – Number of transport accidents, fatalities and injuries (land, air and maritime). Indicator fact sheet. European Environment Agency (17 July 2009).
- Resolution on National Programme on Road Traffic Safety 2007–2011. OG RS, no. 2/2007.


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