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In 2008, electricity consumption decreased for the first time. This was due to reductions in the industrial sector, as individual consumers stopped their operation and due to the economic crisis. A substantial increase was noted in wider use (households and other use).


Electricity consumption is the electricity consumption of the final energy demand sectors. This indicator does not include own use by power plants and distribution losses. It includes electricity consumption in manufacturing and construction, transport, households and other use.

Trends of electricity consumption influence its production. This connection is not formed only on the state level, as the liberalisation of the electricity market ideally means that requirements for electricity can be met from any power plant across Europe. It still holds true though, especially due to limitations in electricity transmissions, that a greater requirement for electricity in Slovenia influences higher production in Slovenia. It is for this reason that information on trends of electricity consumption is a good indicator of environmental impacts caused by the production of electricity.


Charts

Figure EN12-1: Electricity consumption by sector
Sources: 

Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia, 2009; Eurostat, 2009.

Show data
1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001
Manufacturing and construction GWh 4660 4553 4956 4943 4921 4853 5055 5099 5490 5648
Transport GWh 147 146 147 170 258 264 268 271 265 256
Households GWh 2404 2490 2585 2553 2594 2637 2658 2692 2601 2675
Other use GWh 1516 1561 1597 1718 1641 2028 2059 2151 2166 2348
Total GWh 8727 8750 9285 9384 9414 9782 10040 10213 10522 10927
2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
Manufacturing and construction GWh 5790 6543 6710 7172 7440 7468 6233
Transport GWh 172 179 189 197 198 195 196
Households GWh 2704 3008 3012 2951 3055 3021 3182
Other use GWh 3023 2335 2637 2423 2472 2579 3115
Total GWh 11689 12065 12548 12743 13165 13263 12726
Figure EN12-2: Shares in electricity consumption by sector
Sources: 

Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia, 2009; Eurostat, 2009.

Show data
1992 2000 2008
Manufacturing and construction GWh 4660 5490 6233
Transport GWh 147 265 196
Households GWh 2404 2601 3182
Other use GWh 1516 2166 3115
Total GWh 8727 10522 12726
Manufacturing and construction % 53.4 52.2 49
Transport % 1.7 2.5 1.5
Households % 28 25 25
Other use % 17.4 20.6 24.5
Figure EN12-3: Trends of electricity consumption in the 1992-2008 period by sector as regards 1992
Sources: 

Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia, 2009; Eurostat, 2009.

Show data
1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001
Manufacturing and construction GWh 4660 4553 4956 4943 4921 4853 5055 5099 5490 5648
Transport GWh 147 146 147 170 258 264 268 271 265 256
Households GWh 2404 2490 2585 2553 2594 2637 2658 2692 2601 2675
Other use GWh 1516 1561 1597 1718 1641 2028 2059 2151 2166 2348
Total GWh 8727 8750 9285 9384 9414 9782 10040 10213 10522 10927
Manufacturing and construction index (1992 = 100) 100 98 106 106 106 104 108 109 118 121
Transport index (1992 = 100) 100 99 100 116 176 180 182 184 180 174
Households index (1992 = 100) 100 104 108 106 108 110 111 112 108 111
Other use index (1992 = 100) 100 103 105 113 108 134 136 142 143 155
Total index (1992 = 100) 100 100 106 108 108 112 115 117 121 125
2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
Manufacturing and construction GWh 5790 6543 6710 7172 7440 7468 6233
Transport GWh 172 179 189 197 198 195 196
Households GWh 2704 3008 3012 2951 3055 3021 3182
Other use GWh 3023 2335 2637 2423 2472 2579 3115
Total GWh 11689 12065 12548 12743 13165 13263 12726
Manufacturing and construction index (1992 = 100) 124 140 144 154 160 160 134
Transport index (1992 = 100) 117 122 129 134 135 133 133
Households index (1992 = 100) 112 125 125 123 127 126 132
Other use index (1992 = 100) 199 154 174 160 163 170 205
Total index (1992 = 100) 134 138 144 146 151 152 146
Figure EN12-4: Average annual growth rate of total electricity consumption and by sector
Sources: 

Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia, 2009; Eurostat, 2009.

Show data
Manufacturing and construction Transport Households Other use Total
1992-2008 % 1.8 1.8 1.8 4.6 2.4
2000-2008 % 1.6 -3.7 2.6 4.6 2.4
2006-2007 % 0.4 -1.5 -1.1 4.3 0.7
2007-2008 % -16.5 0.5 5.3 20.8 -4
Figure EN12-5: Average annual growth rate of electricity consumption in the EU Member States
Sources: 

Eurostat, 2009.

Show data
EU-27 EU-25 EU-15 EU-10 - Latvia Sweden Luxembourg Belgium Austria
2000 TWh 2516.8 2458.8 2229 229.8 4.4 3 6.2 188.5 5
2001 TWh 2592.1 2531.3 2296.4 234.9 4.5 3.1 6.4 201 5.1
2002 TWh 2599.7 2540.1 2304.3 235.8 4.8 3.4 6.7 206.5 5.3
2003 TWh 2668 2605.4 2362.4 243 5.2 3.6 7.1 220 5.6
2004 TWh 2721.8 2658.2 2407.3 250.9 5.4 3.7 7.6 230.7 5.9
2005 TWh 2762.7 2698.2 2444.7 253.5 5.7 4 7.9 242.2 6
2006 TWh 2826.1 2758.3 2493.7 264.6 6.1 4.2 8.4 256.6 6.5
2007 TWh 2843.2 2775.1 2503.9 271.3 6.6 4.4 8.9 260.1 6.8
2000-2007 % 1.8 1.7 1.7 2.4 5.8 5.5 5.3 4.7 4.5
2006-2007 % 0.6 0.6 0.4 2.5 7.6 5 5.4 1.4 4.7
France Slovenia Netherlands Germany Denmark Ireland Spain United Kingdom Cyprus Czech Republic
2000 TWh 43.1 38.4 20.3 10.5 33.9 1.6 5.7 98.3 49.3 29.4
2001 TWh 44.5 39.9 21 10.9 36.3 1.6 5.6 98.4 50.9 30.5
2002 TWh 46.6 41.5 21.8 11.7 35.6 1.7 5.7 97.2 50.8 31.5
2003 TWh 48.6 43.2 23 12 37.5 1.8 6 100.8 52.4 31.4
2004 TWh 49.7 44.7 23.1 12.5 38.7 1.8 6.4 104.3 53.8 31.8
2005 TWh 50.9 46.3 24.4 12.7 38.8 1.7 6.2 105 55.2 32.3
2006 TWh 52.5 47.8 25.9 13.2 40.9 1.8 6.5 110.6 57 33.2
2007 TWh 55.2 49 25.9 13.2 40.9 1.8 6.7 114.1 57.2 33.7
2000-2007 % 3.6 3.6 3.5 3.3 2.7 2.4 2.3 2.2 2.1 2
2006-2007 % 5.1 2.7 0 0.3 0 0 2.9 3.1 0.4 1.5
Italy Estonia Greece Portugal Slovakia Malta Bulgaria Hungary Poland Latvia
2000 TWh 75.4 272.5 24.1 51.4 22 384.9 482.6 97.9 77.5 32.5
2001 TWh 77.3 277.4 24.5 53 23.5 395.8 505.3 99.4 78.1 32.6
2002 TWh 79.7 282.3 24 52.6 22.8 393.5 498.8 99.7 78.4 32.5
2003 TWh 80.9 291 25.1 54 23 408.3 509.3 100.5 79.7 32.4
2004 TWh 83.1 295 24.9 55.2 24 420 513.3 103.1 80.6 33
2005 TWh 80.9 300.4 25.7 56.3 22.9 422.6 517.5 104.5 80.2 33.5
2006 TWh 85.8 308.3 26.9 57.5 23.6 426.8 528 106 82.6 33.9
2007 TWh 86.1 308.9 27.2 57.5 24.6 425.9 530.4 106.8 82.9 33.7
2000-2007 % 1.9 1.8 1.7 1.6 1.6 1.5 1.4 1.2 1 0.5
2006-2007 % 0.4 0.2 1.2 0 4.2 -0.2 0.5 0.8 0.4 -0.7
Lithuania Romania
2000 TWh 329.4 128.7
2001 TWh 332.7 132.7
2002 TWh 333.4 131.3
2003 TWh 336.2 129.4
2004 TWh 338.9 130.4
2005 TWh 346.5 132.4
2006 TWh 344.7 130.8
2007 TWh 342 132.9
2000-2007 % 0.5 0.5
2006-2007 % -0.8 1.6
Figure EN12-6: Electricity consumption per capita in the EU countries in 2007
Sources: 

Eurostat, 2009.

Show data
EU-27 EU-25 EU-15 EU-10 - Finland Sweden Luxembourg Belgium Austria
2000 MWh/capita 5.2 5.4 5.9 3.2 14.6 14.5 13.2 7.6 6.4
2001 MWh/capita 5.4 5.6 6 3.3 14.9 14.9 12.8 7.6 6.6
2002 MWh/capita 5.4 5.6 6 3.3 15.3 14.7 12.8 7.6 6.5
2003 MWh/capita 5.5 5.7 6.1 3.4 15.5 14.5 13.4 7.7 6.7
2004 MWh/capita 5.6 5.8 6.2 3.5 15.9 14.5 14 7.8 6.8
2005 MWh/capita 5.6 5.9 6.3 3.5 15.5 14.7 13.3 7.7 6.9
2006 MWh/capita 5.7 6 6.4 3.7 16.3 14.5 13.9 7.9 7
2007 MWh/capita 5.7 6 6.4 3.8 16.3 14.6 14.1 7.8 6.9
France Slovenia the Netherlands Germany Denmark Ireland Spain United Kingdom Cyprus Czech Republic
2000 MWh/capita 6.4 5.3 6.2 5.9 6.1 5.4 4.7 5.6 4.4 4.8
2001 MWh/capita 6.5 5.5 6.2 6.1 6.1 5.5 5 5.6 4.5 5
2002 MWh/capita 6.4 5.9 6.2 6.1 6.1 5.6 5 5.6 4.8 5
2003 MWh/capita 6.6 6 6.2 6.2 6 5.8 5.3 5.7 5.1 5.1
2004 MWh/capita 6.8 6.3 6.3 6.2 6.1 5.7 5.5 5.7 5.1 5.3
2005 MWh/capita 6.8 6.4 6.4 6.3 6.2 5.9 5.6 5.8 5.3 5.4
2006 MWh/capita 6.8 6.6 6.5 6.4 6.3 6.2 5.9 5.7 5.4 5.6
2007 MWh/capita 6.7 6.6 6.5 6.4 6.2 6 5.9 5.6 5.6 5.6
Italy Estonia Greece Portugal Slovakia Malta Bulgaria Hungary Poland Latvia
2000 MWh/capita 4.8 3.6 4 3.8 4.1 4.1 3 2.9 2.5 1.9
2001 MWh/capita 4.9 3.8 4.1 3.9 4.4 4 3 3 2.6 1.9
2002 MWh/capita 5 3.9 4.3 4 4.2 4.2 3.1 3.1 2.5 2.1
2003 MWh/capita 5.1 4.1 4.4 4.2 4.3 4.6 3.2 3.1 2.6 2.2
2004 MWh/capita 5.1 4.4 4.5 4.3 4.5 4.5 3.2 3.2 2.7 2.3
2005 MWh/capita 5.1 4.5 4.6 4.4 4.2 4.3 3.3 3.2 2.8 2.5
2006 MWh/capita 5.3 4.8 4.7 4.5 4.4 4.6 3.5 3.3 2.9 2.7
2007 MWh/capita 5.2 5.1 4.9 4.6 4.6 4.5 3.5 3.4 3 2.9
Lithuania Romania
2000 MWh/capita 1.8 1.5
2001 MWh/capita 1.8 1.6
2002 MWh/capita 1.9 1.6
2003 MWh/capita 2.1 1.7
2004 MWh/capita 2.2 1.8
2005 MWh/capita 2.3 1.8
2006 MWh/capita 2.5 1.9
2007 MWh/capita 2.6 1.9

Goals

Slovenia does not have a specific objective for electricity consumption, but the objective can nevertheless be defined within the framework of the following targets:
- 9 % final energy savings by 2016;
- a 1.9 % average annual growth of electricity consumption in the 2000-2010 period;
- a 33.6 % share of renewable energy sources in electricity production by 2010.


The trend in final electricity consumption by sector provides a broad indication of progress made in reducing electricity consumption. Electricity consumption or the growth in electricity consumption can be reduced by using more efficient devices or by reducing the demand for electricity (e.g. turning off lights, turning off standby power to devices that are unused etc.)

Electricity consumption on its own does not cause environmental pressures. Strong environmental pressure is however caused by electricity production, whereby the level of these pressures depends on the method of production and the fuels used. The efficiency of production depends also on the fuel used for electricity generation and the age of the device. New thermal power plants with gas turbines that operate in a combined cycle for example have a 60 % utilisation efficiency while new coal-fired thermal power plants between 40 % and 50 % (see EN13 – Efficiency of Electricity Production). The efficiency of electricity production is additionally reduced by own use of electricity in production and transmission and distribution losses. Boilers for domestic hot water or water used for heating have a utilisation efficiency of over 90 %. This is why the switch from other end-use energy types towards electricity increases environmental pressures.

In 2008, electricity consumption amounted to 12,726 GWh, which is 4 % less than the year before. The largest share pertains to manufacturing and construction (49 %), households (25 %) and other use (24 %). 2 % of total electricity consumption pertains to transport (for the operation of trains and ski lifts or cable cars). In 2008, electricity contributed slightly less than 21 % to final energy consumption, which is an almost identical percentage to that in the year 2000.

In 2008, total electricity consumption was 46 % higher than in 1992 and 21 % higher than in the year 2000. In 2007, the lowest annual growth since 1996 was recorded (0.7 %) and the reduction in 2008 was the first throughout the entire observed period.

As regards electricity consumption by sector in the 1992-2008 period, the largest growth was noted in other use (105 %) followed by manufacturing and construction (34 %), transport (33 %) and households (32 %).

On the one hand, electricity consumption in the other use sector grew due to changes in the method of data collection, as this item is calculated as the difference between total electricity consumption in Slovenia (excluding own use of power plants and losses) and consumption in manufacturing and construction, transport and household sectors and changes in the tariff group (Merše, 2005). On the other hand, this growth is also due to the growth of the sector itself (in 2008, real added value was 94 % higher than in 1992). In 2008, consumption increased by slightly less than 21 %. A similar increase was recorded also in 2002, whereby in 2003, consumption decreased by 23 %.

In the 1992-2008 period, electricity consumption grew at a rate of 1.8 % and in the last seven years at 1.6 % annually. In the sixteen-year period, added value in manufacturing grew at an average annual rate of 4.4 % and in the last eight years at a rate of 5.0 %. After the year 2000, consumption substantially increased in 2003 due to the operation of the new electrolysis facility in the production of primary aluminium and in 2005 due to increased consumption in the manufacture of basic metals and fabricated metal products and in construction. The minimal growth in 2007 is the result of a reduction in electricity consumption in the manufacture of basic metals and fabricated metal products sector (the gradual closing of Electrolysis B that concluded in December of the same year) and in construction. Electricity consumption substantially decreased also in food and beverages production. On the other hand however, electricity consumption increased in the manufacture of machinery, equipment and transport equipment (Revoz), in the chemical industry and in the manufacture of non-metallic mineral products (cement, lime, etc.). The reduction in 2008 was predominantly due to lower consumption in the manufacture of basic metals and fabricated metal products due to the Electrolysis B facility ceasing operation and the onset of the economic crisis (ironworks). An important effect on the consumption was also the reduction in the production of chemicals and chemical products (the ceased operation of TDR Ruše) and in the manufacture of machinery and equipment. A smaller reduction was noted also in other branches with the exception of the manufacture of electrical and optical equipment and manufacture of transport equipment, where consumption increased. Despite a substantial reduction, the manufacture of basic metals and fabricated metal products, which includes the manufacture of aluminium and steel, still holds the largest share in electricity consumption in the manufacturing sector, as this branch consumed slightly more than 39 % of all electricity consumed by industry. In 2008, this branch held 19 % of added value. In 2008, two other industries held a share of electricity consumption over 10 %. These are the manufacture of pulp, paper and paper products (DE) and the manufacture of chemicals, chemical products and man-made fibres (DG). Their share in added value accounts for 8 % and 14 % respectively. The reduction in electricity consumption by industry is therefore due to the closing of plants and the economic crisis that had already had a substantial effect on the operation of different companies by December of that year. In 2007, the high price of electricity, which dropped in 2008 due to lower demand, also had an important effect on consumption.

In 2008, electricity consumption by households increased by 5.3 %. After 2003, consumption constantly changed: a reduction in 2005, growth in 2006, another reduction in 2007 and again an increase in 2008. Furthermore, consumption substantially increased in 2003, which is probably related to data collection, as in the same year, consumption in the other use sector substantially decreased (the same applies also to manufacturing and construction). The growth in electricity consumption by households is influenced by the rising standard of living and the resulting furnishing of households with major and small household appliances, large LCD and plasma screens, air-conditioners, lighting, etc., the growth in the number of households, the growing computerisation of households (a higher number of broadband internet access connections, growth in the number of households owning and using computers) and by the increased use of other electronic devices (mobile phones, wireless phones, audio and video devices, etc.) In the future, electricity consumption will be strongly influenced by the implementation of digital television, as watching programmes on an old (analogue) device will require the use of an additional device. On the other hand, reductions in electricity consumption are influenced by substantial improvements made to the energy efficiency of major household appliances, energy labelling of appliances, which has a positive impact on the structure of these appliances, since the price is no longer the only criterion when buying a new appliance and by information and awareness campaigns. According to research conducted by the Jožef Stefan Institute for the year 2005, the structure of electricity consumption by households is as follows: 25 % for heating domestic water, 21 % for cooling (freezers and refrigerators), 14 % for washing and drying, 10 % for lighting, 9 % for cooking, 6 % for heating and 15 % for other uses (where television sets prevail with 6 %).

In the 2000-2007 period, electricity consumption increased in all of the EU-27 countries, with different trends being evident in 2007. Consumption decreased in five Member States, the most being in the United Kingdom and Denmark. In seven Member States, including Slovenia, growth was below 1 %. In three countries, growth exceeded 5 %, with the highest growth being noted in Latvia. As regards growth in the 2000-2007 period, Slovenia is part of the top half of countries together with several new Member States, Ireland and Portugal. As regards growth in 2007, we are in the bottom third. As regards the EU-25 average, growth in Slovenia was substantially higher in the seven-year period, while it was 50 % below average in 2007.

Electricity consumption per capita greatly varies between countries, as it is influenced by several factors – the structure of manufacturing industries, the structure of electricity consumption by households (for heating, for domestic hot water, etc.), the standard of living, etc. Slovenia is among the top third with the main reason being the low level of energy consumption in wider use (the third lowest share in the EU-27), as electricity consumption by the industrial sector is much more intense.

The Operational Programme for Limiting Greenhouse Gas Emissions by 2012 sees high growth in electricity consumption as one of potential problems in reaching our Kyoto targets. It therefore contains numerous measures aimed at reducing this growth. Furthermore, growth in electricity consumption makes it difficult for Slovenia to achieve the 33.6 % share of renewable energy sources in electricity production by 2010 pursuant to Directive 2001/77/EC, the Treaty of Accession 2003 and the Resolution on the National Energy Programme. The instruments that will facilitate a more efficient use of electricity are:
• Manufacturing: energy audits of companies, implementation of energy management, adapting the industry to the best available techniques (IPPC), excise duty on electricity, etc;
• Wider use: incentives for purchasing energy efficient home appliances and energy saving light bulbs, awareness campaigns on the energy consumption of devices in standby mode, incentives for purchasing energy efficient office equipment, energy labelling for household appliances, minimum requirements, etc.;
• Public and service sectors: green public procurement, excise duty on electricity, etc.

A reduction in the growth of electricity consumption is even more important in light of meeting the objectives of the Directive on Energy End-Use Efficiency and Energy Services, i.e. at least 9 % energy savings in 9 years. In achieving this objective, electricity plays an important role, as savings are multiplied by a factor of 2.5. The National Energy Efficiency Action Plan for the 2008-2016 period, which the Member States had to prepare in accordance with the said Directive, determines measures to achieve the target savings. The Slovene action plan lists the following measures aimed at increasing efficient electricity consumption:
• Households: financial incentives for efficient electricity consumption including incentives for purchasing energy efficient household appliances (refrigerators, freezers, washing machines and dishwashers), co-financing and promotion of purchasing energy saving light bulbs and implementing intelligent meters, fast measuring and consulting in households and energy labelling of household appliances and other devices.
• The tertiary sector: co-financing or purchase of 1,000,000 energy saving light bulbs, installing lighting control for 700 systems of public lighting and 38,000 energy saving light bulbs, refurbishment of 1000 air-conditioning and 2000 ventilation systems and conducting 1500 audits and consultations.
• Industry: financial incentives for measures aimed at facilitating efficient electricity consumption, including investments in energy efficient electric motors, pumps and fans, frequency regulation of rotation speeds, energy efficient compressed air systems and energy-saving lighting.
• Multi-sectoral instruments: Demand Side Management (DMS) programmes that will be implemented by electricity suppliers, requirements for minimum energy efficiency of products that currently include refrigerators, freezers and ballasts. In the future, the range of these products will be substantially expanded.

The implementation of these measures foresees total electricity savings of 516 GWh through the entire period of the action plan. The required financial means amount to 75 million euros.


Data for Slovenia and other countries

Objectives summarised by: Resolucija o Nacionalnem energetskem programu (Resolution on the National Energy Programme, Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia, No. 57/04) and Directive 2006/32/EC on Energy End-Use Efficiency and Energy Services.

Source database or source: For the 1996-2008 period, data provided by the Statistical office of the Republic of Slovenia were used as obtained using the SI-STAT data portal (> Environment and natural resources > Energy > Electricity > Balance of production and consumption of electricity (GWh), Slovenia, annual.
For the 1992-1995 period, data as submitted to EUROSTAT in the Joint Annual Questionnaire were used. The number of inhabitants was obtained from EUROSTAT’s website.

Data administrator: The Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia – Jože Zalar and EUROSTAT.

Date of acquisition for this indicator: 27 November 2009

Methodology and frequency of data collection: Data on electricity consumption are prepared (collected) on an annual basis and published on the website of the Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia and in printed form. For the indicator, data on electricity consumption by manufacturing and construction, transport, households and other use sectors were used. EUROSTAT marks these sectors as 101800 (Industry), 101900 (Transport) and 102000 (Other Sectors) Data have further been sent to Eurostat. The EUROSTAT/IEA methodology has been used in preparing data. Two different sources of information were used – before 1996, the source of information was the filled in EUROSTAT questionnaire and since 1996, the official statistics of the Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia.

Data processing methodology: Average annual rate of growth in electricity consumption is calculated using [(last year/base year) ^ (1/number of years) –1] x 100.
Electricity consumption per capita is calculated by dividing electricity consumption by the population of each country. The population as of 1 January was used.
The share of individual sectors is calculated as the ratio of electricity consumption by an individual sector and total electricity consumption.

Geographical coverage: The EU-27 countries are the EU Member States: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom. The EU-25 countries are the EU Member States excluding Bulgaria and Romania. The EU-15 are the EU Member States prior to enlargement (Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxemburg, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom). The EU-10 countries are Member States that acceded to the EU in 2004 (Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia).

Information concerning data quality:
- Advantages and disadvantages of the indicator: Officially reported data that are calculated using internationally confirmed methods have been used to calculate the indicator.
- Relevance, accuracy, robustness, uncertainty:
Reliability of the indicator (archival data): Data are reliable.
Uncertainty of the indicator (scenarios/projections): Scenarios and projections are not available.
- Overall assessment (1 = no major comments, 2 = data to be considered with reservation):
Relevance: 1
Accuracy: 2
Completeness over time: 2
Completeness over space: 1

Other sources and literature:

- Directive 2006/32/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 5 April 2006 on Energy End-Use Efficiency and Energy Services and Repealing Council Directive 93/76/EEC.
- EEA, 2008. EN18 Electricity Consumption.
- Merše, 2005. Načrtovanje vključevanja ukrepov usmerjanja porabe električne energije v Sloveniji, kot element za prognozo porabe električne energije (Integrated Resource Planning – IRP), Final Report.
- Ministry of the Environment and Spatial Planning, 2008. Nacionalni akcijski načrt za energetsko učinkovitost za obdobje 2008-2016 (National Energy Efficiency Action Plan for the 2008-2016 period).

- Ministry of the Environment and Spatial Planning, 2009. Operativni program zmanjševanja emisij toplogrednih plinov do leta 2012 (Operational Programme for Limiting Greenhouse Gas Emissions by 2012).


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