KAZALCI OKOLJA

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Bad

Data on air pollution shows that Slovenian cities are overpolluted, primarily with NO2 and PM10. Transport is one of the main causes of this pollution. In general, air quality is improving, especially since the economic downturn in 2008 after which the volume of passenger traffic was reduced.

Neutral

In the last decades, major emissions of air pollutants from transport decreased. However, road transport remains one of the most significant sources of air pollution. In Slovenia in 2018 road transport contributed 47 % to the total emissions of nitrogen oxides. In the period 1990-2018 emissions of substances that cause acidification and emissions of ozone precursors in transport sector declined by 58 % and 68 %. In the period 2000-2018 emissions of particulate matter decreased by 35 %.

Bad

In 2012, greenhouse gas emissions from transport in Slovenia had increased by 185% compared to 1986. Also, at the EU level, GHG emissions from transport by far exceeded the growth – in the period 1990–2014, they increased by 13% (in Slovenia, they increased by slightly less than 97% in the same period). A major source of GHGs is road transport, which contributed approximately 99.2% in 2012. The share of GHG emissions from transport (31% in 2012) and insufficiently effective measures to reduce GHGs makes fulfilling commitments under the Kyoto Protocol difficult to accomplish in Slovenia.

Neutral

Although the annual number of fatalities in road transport in Slovenia has been declining for decades and has almost halved in the last 20 years, traffic accidents over the last decade took more than 190 lives a year, on average. The number of deaths in road accidents has been declining over the last decade. This positive trend is also seen in most other European countries.

Bad

Passenger car ownership in Slovenia has almost doubled over the last 20 years and has an above-average growth rate. It is closely connected to the use of passenger cars. Since 2008, passenger car ownership in Slovenia has been growing more slowly as a result of the economic recession. Also, motorisation level (expressed in the number of cars per thousand inhabitants) in Slovenia exceeds the average rate of motorisation in the EU as well as in numerous more economically developed EU countries.

Bad

The average age of passenger cars in Slovenia increased from 6.8 years in 1992 to 9.4 years in 2014. The structure of passenger cars by age changed as well. The number of passenger cars older than 12 years more than doubled in 2015 in comparison to 2001. Also, the share of passenger cars aged less than three years decreased by almost a half during this period. The share of heavy duty vehicles and the share of mopeds and motorcycles older than 12 years has also increased since 2009, while the share of these vehicles under three years of age decreased in the same period.

Bad

The introduction of biofuels in Slovenia and the objectives in this area are lagging behind the referential values set out in the EU Directive on the promotion of the use of biofuels and other renewable fuels for transport. Slovenia explains the deviations from the referential values with the limited possibilities for biofuel production, the discrepancies between the prices of mineral fuels and biofuels and the burdening of biofuels with excise duties, which creates market conditions that do not stimulate consumers to use biofuels.

Bad

The share of household expenditure on personal mobility remains relatively stable over time. High income groups and people from economically developed countries spend more money on car purchases and personal mobility in comparison to low income groups and people from less economically developed countries. In 2014, the share of personal mobility in the expenditure of households in Slovenia was about 16%. Of this, about 12% was spent on the functioning of vehicles and about 3% on the purchase of vehicles. Only around 1% was spent on public transport.

Bad

In comparison with the European average, the levels of transport charges in Slovenia are relatively low. The charges for the road freight transport subsystem are somewhere at the average level, while in the rail freight transport subsystem substantially below the average level of other European countries.

Neutral

In 2015, prices of motor fuels have been decreasing. In comparison to year 2014, the real prices of diesel D2 decreased by 14.5%, the price of NMB 95 by 16.6% and the price of LPG by as much as 20.7%. Prices of motor fuels are directly influenced by price developments in the wider European market, changes in taxation and the introduction and opening up of markets.


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