KAZALCI OKOLJA

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Neutral

The European Community has met its commitments under the first period of the Kyoto Protocol, as total emissions (excluding the sinks) in the period 2008-2012 were around 19% lower than in the base year.  By imposing the maximum level of allowed sinks, Slovenia has exceeded the 2012 target by about 3%.

In 2018, Slovenian GHG emissions increased by 0.8% compared to 2017. Therefore, Slovenia is on a good track to achieve the EU goal, as non-ETS GHG emissions in 2018 were about 10% below the allocated emissions for 2017.

Bad

In 2016, the ecological footprint of Slovenia was 5.13 gha per capita. For such a lifestyle 3.14 Earths would be required for the world's population to live within planetary regenerative capacity. This places Slovenia above the average of the EU countries (4.59 gha per capita). The carbon footprint usually accounts for around 60% of the total ecological footprint and therefore needs to receive comparatively more attention. According to consumption categories, housing and personal transportation contribute the most to the ecological footprint in Slovenia.

Neutral

In 2012, more than half of Slovenia's land area was covered by forests (56% or 58% including shrubland), while other mostly natural vegetation accounted for 4%. Farmland occupied 35% of land area, while slightly less than 3% was artificial land. In the periods 1996–2000, 2000–2006 and 2006–2012, land cover and land use changes were relatively small (they occurred on 0.12%, 0.13% and 0.09% of the entire territory, respectively). The majority of detected changes were related to forest management and infrastructure construction.

Neutral

In 2020, Slovenia recorded a slight increase in the number and total area of functionally depreciated areas (FDAs): 1,132 FDAs were recorded in the total area of 3,695.3 ha. Compared to 2017, their number increased by 51, with a total area of 272.5 ha.

We can notice positive trends towards the revitalization of FDAs, as new activity has taken off on 108 locations, on the 292 FDAs there have been major changes in recent years, where many remediation and renewal processes began, while else ware the physical condition and degradation of the area has deteriorated.

Bad

Over the period 2008–2012, the area of built-up land, representing 5.4% of land use in Slovenia, increased. The percentage of built-up land is distinctly higher in the Central Slovenia and Podravje statistical regions. The existing data sources do not allow a precise quantitative evaluation of the process of land conversion to urban/residential/industrial use.

Neutral

Water consumption in Slovenia represents a relatively small proportion of the annual gross water outflow from the country. In 2018, the annual WEI+ index was around 3%, or, compared to the periodic average of water availability. The Long-term Annual Average Water Exploitation Index shows a slight decrease, but the trend is not statistically significant.

Neutral

In recent years, the amount of wastewater treated by secondary or tertiary treatment processes increased, while primary treatment processes have closed. The amount of wastewater treated through secondary treatment processes increased by 118 % since 2002 or from 38 million m3 (in 2002) to almoust 46 million m3 (in 2018). There were almost no tertiary wastewater treatment processes in Slovenia in 2002, and in 2018, 72% of wastewater or 116 million m3 of wastewater was treated by tertiary process.

Neutral

Slovenian groundwater bodies most polluted with nitrates are those with intergranular (alluvium) aquifers, particularly in north-eastern Slovenia. Groundwater in karst and fractured aquifers is less burdened with nitrates due to geographical conditions, low population density and less agricultural land. In the period 1998–2019, the average annual levels of nitrates in water bodies in the Sava valley, Ljubljansko barje, Savinja, Drava and Mura basins show a statistically significant downward trend. In other water bodies, nitrate levels are not statistically significant.

Neutral

In general, the levels of pesticides in groundwater are decreasing. In Slovenian lowlands (the Drava and Mura river basins), which are characterised by intensive agricultural activity, certain pesticides, phytopharmaceuticals in particular, still exceed quality standards. Individual point sources of pollution can be a result of unskilled use of plant protection products.

Neutral

In Europe, the number of lakes with low phosphorus content and greater transparency is increasing, which is the result of measures taken to reduce pollution in their catchment areas. Compared to the 70s, improvement has been observed in Lake Bled since the introduction of remediation measures. As a result, the lake is again classified as moderately burdened and mesotrophic. However, excessive concentrations of phosphorous compounds are still occasionally present, which are reflected in increased phytoplankton biomass and reduced transparency of the lake.


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