KAZALCI OKOLJA

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The average age of passenger cars in Slovenia increased from 6.8 years in 1992 to 9.4 years in 2014. The structure of passenger cars by age changed as well. The number of passenger cars older than 12 years more than doubled in 2015 in comparison to 2001. Also, the share of passenger cars aged less than three years decreased by almost a half during this period. The share of heavy duty vehicles and the share of mopeds and motorcycles older than 12 years has also increased since 2009, while the share of these vehicles under three years of age decreased in the same period.

Bad

In 2017, the ecological footprint of Slovenia was 4.9 gha per capita. For such a lifestyle 3.1 Earths would be required for the world's population to live within planetary regenerative capacity. This places Slovenia above the average of the EU countries (4.6 gha per capita). The carbon footprint usually accounts for around 60% of the total ecological footprint and therefore needs to receive comparatively more attention. According to consumption categories, housing and personal transportation contribute the most to the ecological footprint in Slovenia.

Neutral

In 2018, more than half of Slovenia's land area was covered by forests (56% or 58% including shrubland), while other mostly natural vegetation accounted for 3%. Farmland occupied 34% of land area, while slightly less than 4% was artificial land, and less than 1% was water. In the periods 1996–2000, 2000–2006 and 2006–2012, land cover and land use changes were relatively small (they occurred on 0.12%, 0.13% and 0.09% of the entire territory, respectively). In the latest period 2012–2018 land cover and land use changes slightly increase (they occurred on 0,44 % ot the entire territory).

Neutral

In 2020, Slovenia recorded a slight increase in the number and total area of functionally depreciated areas (FDAs): 1,132 FDAs were recorded in the total area of 3,695.3 ha. Compared to 2017, their number increased by 51, with a total area of 272.5 ha.

We can notice positive trends towards the revitalization of FDAs, as new activity has taken off on 108 locations, on the 292 FDAs there have been major changes in recent years, where many remediation and renewal processes began, while else ware the physical condition and degradation of the area has deteriorated.

Bad

After 2012, the volume of built-up areas in Slovenia continues to increase, representing 5.6% of the land use structure in 2019. In this period, built-up areas were predominantly spread to grasslands (47%), forests (21%) and permanent crops (13%), while in the period 2012–2019 the total volume of built-up areas increased by 3,966 ha. Existing data sources in Slovenia do not yet enable the evaluation of the actual loss of land for the needs of construction.

Neutral

Water consumption in Slovenia represents a relatively small proportion of the annual gross water outflow from the country. In 2019, the annual WEI+ index was around 3%, and same 3% compared to the periodic average of water availability. The Long-term Annual Average Water Exploitation Index shows a slight decrease, but the trend is not statistically significant.

Neutral

In recent years, the amount of wastewater treated by secondary or tertiary treatment processes increased, while primary treatment processes have closed. The amount of wastewater treated through secondary treatment processes increased by 150 % since 2000 or from 30 million m3 (in 2000) to almoust 45 million m3 (in 2019). There were almost no tertiary wastewater treatment processes in Slovenia in 2000, and in 2019, 72% of wastewater or 113 million m3 of wastewater was treated by tertiary process.

Neutral

Slovenian groundwater bodies most polluted with nitrates are those with intergranular (alluvium) aquifers, particularly in north-eastern Slovenia. Groundwater in karst and fractured aquifers is less burdened with nitrates due to geographical conditions, low population density and less agricultural land. In the period 1998–2020, the average annual levels of nitrates in water bodies in the Sava valley, Ljubljansko barje, Savinja, Drava and Mura basins show a statistically significant downward trend. In other water bodies, nitrate levels are not statistically significant.

Neutral

In general, the levels of pesticides in groundwater are decreasing. In Slovenian lowlands (the Drava and Mura river basins), which are characterised by intensive agricultural activity, certain pesticides, phytopharmaceuticals in particular, still exceed quality standards. Individual point sources of pollution can be a result of unskilled use of plant protection products.

Neutral

In Slovenia, nutrient overloading is still the basic problem concerning lakes and reservoirs, and from 2006 to 2019, no improvement is observed. In the assessment period 2016–2019, only 4 out of 11 lake water bodies were determined to be in good or very good trophic status. Overloading of lakes with phosphorus is usually a result of inadequate wastewater drainage and intensive agriculture in the watershed area.


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