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In 2012, total energy consumption decreased by 3.4%, making it the lowest since 2003. Energy consumption reached its peak in 2008. The share of liquid fuels was highest, followed by nuclear energy, solid fuels, renewable energy sources and gaseous fuels. In 2012, only the share of renewable energy sources increased, while the average annual growth of other fuels declined. Total energy consumption growth in Slovenia after 2000 exceeded that of the EU-27.


Total energy consumption (sometimes also referred to as energy supply) is the amount of energy necessary to satisfy the energy needs of a country. It is calculated as the sum of total energy consumption (in the form of solid, liquid, gaseous and nuclear fuels and renewable energy sources) and net imports of electricity.

 


Charts

Figure EN16-1: Total energy consumption by fuel
Sources: 
Statistical Office of the RS (2017)
; Energy efficiency centre, Jožef Stefan Institute (2018)
Show data

Total energy consumption

Electric power

Industrial waste

Renewables

Nuclear

Gaseous fuels

Liquid fuels

Solid fuels

1992

5213.65

-155.89

0

529.74

1034.68

615.30

1631.17

1558.64

1993

5458.88

-121.93

0

523.40

1030.77

614.64

1944.30

1467.69

1994

5697.54

-166.29

0

555.40

1200.92

629.71

2099.99

1377.81

1995

6060.47

-142.05

0

542.40

1245.21

745.76

2261.83

1407.31

1996

6362.21

-142.82

0

579.40

1210.82

728.55

2656.82

1329.44

1997

6572.10

-145.83

0

529.40

1307.75

794.78

2670.26

1415.75

1998

6404.72

-165.00

0

560.40

1313.74

820.97

2443.29

1431.33

1999

6347.43

-115.05

0

554.78

1223.59

853.66

2522.40

1308.06

2000

6490.78

-113.59

0.33

787.66

1240.52

825.29

2392.12

1358.45

2001

6665.26

-152.36

0.19

776.31

1369.76

849.70

2371.32

1450.33

2002

6729.68

-97.51

0.07

715.40

1440.37

819.59

2303.49

1548.27

2003

6822.93

14.10

8.74

713.88

1356.73

906.67

2333.48

1489.32

2004

7029.59

-65.00

10.37

821.75

1422.39

898.54

2403.25

1538.30

2005

7206.82

-27.89

12.96

773.85

1533.13

929.00

2453.32

1532.45

2006

7218.45

3.80

15.95

770.04

1445.58

899.21

2516.63

1567.25

2007

7243.18

19.62

12.78

736.84

1483.88

914.44

2479.27

1596.34

2008

7650.22

-137.54

14.52

852.92

1634.49

878.25

2878.65

1528.93

2009

7089.78

-263.02

19.78

1079.14

1495.35

831.06

2504.27

1423.20

2010

7211.44

-182.29

23.28

1120.59

1473.98

862.26

2458.36

1455.25

2011

7280.05

-117.97

29.33

1039.27

1619.31

737.80

2502.47

1469.83

2012

7007.12

-89.32

31.84

1069.29

1440.35

709.67

2450.57

1394.72

2013

6806.58

-110.86

34.70

1173.50

1380.86

691.72

2281.06

1355.59

2014

6571.33

-235.80

43.21

1202.28

1659.67

625.63

2226.32

1050.02

2015

6454.48

-4.13

43.04

1055.78

1471.71

664.14

2209.44

1014.50

Figure EN16-2: Trends of energy consumption by fuel and total energy consumption in the period 1992-2015
Sources: 
Statistical Office of the RS (2017)
; Energy efficiency centre, Jožef Stefan Institute (2017)
Show data

Total energy consumption

Renewables

Nuclear

Gaseous fuels

Liquid fuels

Solid fuels

Total energy consumption

Electric power

Industrial waste

Renewables

Nuclear

Gaseous fuels

Liquid fuels

Solid fuels

1992

100

100

100

100

100

100

5213.65

-155.89

0

529.74

1034.68

615.30

1631.17

1558.64

1993

104.70

98.80

99.62

99.89

119.20

94.16

5458.88

-121.93

0

523.40

1030.77

614.64

1944.30

1467.69

1994

109.28

104.84

116.07

102.34

128.74

88.40

5697.54

-166.29

0

555.40

1200.92

629.71

2099.99

1377.81

1995

116.24

102.39

120.35

121.20

138.66

90.29

6060.47

-142.05

0

542.40

1245.21

745.76

2261.83

1407.31

1996

122.03

109.37

117.02

118.40

162.88

85.29

6362.21

-142.82

0

579.40

1210.82

728.55

2656.82

1329.44

1997

126.06

99.93

126.39

129.17

163.70

90.83

6572.10

-145.83

0

529.40

1307.75

794.78

2670.26

1415.75

1998

122.85

105.79

126.97

133.43

149.79

91.83

6404.72

-165.00

0

560.40

1313.74

820.97

2443.29

1431.33

1999

121.75

104.73

118.26

138.74

154.64

83.92

6347.43

-115.05

0

554.78

1223.59

853.66

2522.40

1308.06

2000

124.50

148.69

119.89

134.13

146.65

87.16

6490.78

-113.59

0.33

787.66

1240.52

825.29

2392.12

1358.45

2001

127.84

146.55

132.38

138.10

145.38

93.05

6665.26

-152.36

0.19

776.31

1369.76

849.70

2371.32

1450.33

2002

129.08

135.05

139.21

133.20

141.22

99.33

6729.68

-97.51

0.07

715.40

1440.37

819.59

2303.49

1548.27

2003

130.87

134.76

131.13

147.35

143.06

95.55

6822.93

14.10

8.74

713.88

1356.73

906.67

2333.48

1489.32

2004

134.83

155.12

137.47

146.03

147.33

98.69

7029.59

-65.00

10.37

821.75

1422.39

898.54

2403.25

1538.30

2005

138.23

146.08

148.17

150.98

150.40

98.32

7206.82

-27.89

12.96

773.85

1533.13

929.00

2453.32

1532.45

2006

138.45

145.36

139.71

146.14

154.28

100.55

7218.45

3.80

15.95

770.04

1445.58

899.21

2516.63

1567.25

2007

138.93

139.09

143.41

148.62

151.99

102.42

7243.18

19.62

12.78

736.84

1483.88

914.44

2479.27

1596.34

2008

146.73

161.01

157.97

142.73

176.48

98.09

7650.22

-137.54

14.52

852.92

1634.49

878.25

2878.65

1528.93

2009

135.99

203.71

144.52

135.06

153.53

91.31

7089.78

-263.02

19.78

1079.14

1495.35

831.06

2504.27

1423.20

2010

138.32

211.53

142.46

140.14

150.71

93.37

7211.44

-182.29

23.28

1120.59

1473.98

862.26

2458.36

1455.25

2011

139.63

196.18

156.50

119.91

153.42

94.30

7280.05

-117.97

29.33

1039.27

1619.31

737.80

2502.47

1469.83

2012

134.40

201.85

139.21

115.34

150.23

89.48

7007.12

-89.32

31.84

1069.29

1440.35

709.67

2450.57

1394.72

2013

130.55

221.52

133.46

112.42

139.84

86.97

6806.58

-110.86

34.70

1173.50

1380.86

691.72

2281.06

1355.59

2014

126.04

226.96

160.40

101.68

136.49

67.37

6571.33

-235.80

43.21

1202.28

1659.67

625.63

2226.32

1050.02

2015

123.80

199.30

142.24

107.94

135.45

65.09

6454.48

-4.13

43.04

1055.78

1471.71

664.14

2209.44

1014.50

Figure EN16-3: Structure of total energy consumption for the EU-27 and Slovenia
Sources: 
EUROSTAT (2017)
; Energy efficiency centre, Jožef Stefan Institute (2017)
Show data

Electric power

Industrial waste

Renewables

Nuclear

Gaseous fuels

Liquid fuels

Solid fuels

Total energy consumption

Electric power

Industrial waste

Renewables

Nuclear

Gaseous fuels

Liquid fuels

Solid fuels

SI - 2000

-1.76

0.00

12.21

19.04

12.80

37.49

20.22

6451.10

-113.60

0.30

787.60

1228.10

825.60

2418.60

1304.50

SI - 2005

-0.38

0.18

10.56

20.72

12.68

35.23

21.01

7325.50

-27.90

12.90

773.90

1517.80

928.80

2580.60

1539.40

SI - 2013

-1.61

0.50

17.20

19.89

10.07

34.29

19.66

6873.50

-110.90

34.70

1182.40

1367.20

691.90

2357.20

1351

SI - 2014

-3.53

0.65

18.33

24.59

9.37

34.92

15.67

6681.90

-235.90

43.20

1224.70

1643.20

626

2333.50

1047.20

EU-28 2000

0.11

0.35

5.68

14.09

22.90

38.28

18.57

1729981.80

1979.40

6062.50

98253.60

243840.80

396216.60

662320.60

321308.30

EU-28 2005

0.07

0.43

6.61

14.06

24.32

37.13

17.37

1831036.50

1351.50

7817.90

121014.10

257516

445272.50

679933.90

318130.60

EU-28 - 2013

0.07

0.73

11.87

13.58

23.24

33.34

17.17

1666700.20

1084.40

12204.90

197884

226285.10

387356.10

555670.40

286215.30

EU-28 - 2014

0.08

0.79

12.53

14.08

21.35

34.45

16.72

1605930.30

1332.50

12623.60

201240.90

226131.90

342916.50

553167.50

268517.40


Goals

  • minimum increase in total energy consumption or increase rate lower than GDP growth rate;
  • 20% energy efficiency improvement by 2020
     

When differences between environmental footprints of various fuel types are taken into account, the impact of energy consumption on the environment can be assessed by using the data on total energy consumption by fuel type. The use of fossil fuels causes emissions of greenhouse gases and air pollutants, with emissions resulting from the use of natural gas being considerably lower than emissions caused by the use of coal. In addition to this, the extraction and transport of fossil fuels contributes significantly to adverse impacts on the environment and the use of fossil fuels is limited by the reserves. While the use of nuclear energy causes no emissions of greenhouse gases or air pollutants, it is problematic due to nuclear waste and the risk of accidents. From the perspective of emissions, the environment is least affected by the use of renewable energy sources. Nevertheless, the use of energy derived from renewable sources may affect ecosystems or landscapes. Therefore, it can be concluded that the use of any type of energy affects the environment in one way or another. The impact can be reduced through changes in the structure of fuels used and, particularly, by reduced energy consumption where better energy efficiency can play an important role.

In 2012, total energy consumption in Slovenia was 6,988 ktoe. Compared to 2011, it was reduced by 3.4%, while in the period 1992–2012, consumption increased at an annual rate of 1.5%. The highest consumption was in 2008, amounting to 7,650 ktoe. In the structure of total energy consumption in 2012, liquid fuels prevailed (35%), followed by nuclear energy (21%) and solid fuels (20%), while the share of renewable energy sources (RES) was 15% and natural gas 10%. Net electricity imports represented -1.1% of total energy consumption (more electricity was exported than imported).

In the period 1992–2000, consumption of fossil fuels increased by 20%. The greatest contributor was the increase in the consumption of liquid fuels (94%), while the consumption of natural gas increased by 34% and the consumption of solid fuels decreased by 13%. Consumption of nuclear energy grew by 20%, while RES consumption increased by 49%, which is largely a consequence of the improved assessment of the use of wood biomass in 2000. Total energy consumption in the stated period increased by 25%. In the period 2000–2012, there was a 14% drop in natural gas consumption, which was mostly a consequence of the economic crisis and the termination of methanol production in 2011, which caused a dramatic reduction in the use of natural gas for industrial purposes and non-energy purposes in industry. Consumption of other energy sources increased, with very diverse trends through the period. The highest increase was recorded in RES consumption (32%), which was largely a consequence of the improved RES statistics as well as the promotion of the use of RES, which contributed to an increase in the use of other RES (biomass, geothermal, solar). In 2012, hydroelectric energy consumption was slightly higher than in 2000 (for more information see indicator EN18: Renewable energy sources). Consumption of liquid fuels increased by 11%, while the increase in consumption of solid fuels was 3%. Net electricity imports decreased only slightly (by 2%). Total energy consumption increased by 8%. In 2012, consumption of all energy sources besides RES decreased, most notably nuclear energy, due to the overhaul cycle.

Due to the differences in the growth of consumption of various energy sources, their shares in total energy consumption changed as well. In 2012, the share of liquid fuels was 2 percentage points lower than in 2000 and almost 4 percentage points higher than in 1992. The share of nuclear energy increased by 1.5 percentage points compared to 2000 and by 0.8 percentage point compared to 1992. The share of gaseous fuels declined by 2.6 percentage points compared to 2000 and by 1.7 percentage points compared to 1992. Solid fuels are used only in electricity and heat generation and in industry (production of paper and fibres, production of cement).

As the structure of fuels in total energy consumption is changing, the CO2 intensity of total energy consumption is changing as well, which affects total CO2 emissions. In the period 1992–2011, it was reduced by 13%. On the other hand, total energy consumption increased by 39%. As a result, emissions from energy sources increased by 20% over the period 1992–2011.

In the future, due to technological improvements in the transformation sector, which will also include fuel changes, further replacement of liquid fuels with gaseous fuels, wood biomass and other renewable energy sources in households, services and agriculture as well as the increased use of RES in other sectors, greater changes towards lower impacts on the environment and consequently lower CO2 emissions are expected in the structure of total energy consumption. Furthermore, a decrease in primary energy consumption is expected as a result of the implementation of energy efficiency measures. Namely, according to one of the goals set by the EU Energy Efficiency Directive, total energy consumption at the EU-27 level in 2020 must not exceed 1,474 Mtoe, which is 13% below the total energy consumption in the EU-27 in 2011. The Member States were obliged to communicate their energy efficiency goals (they also had to be expressed as total energy consumption in absolute terms) to the European Commission by 30 April 2013, which was done by all countries except Slovenia. The anticipated total energy consumption by 2020 must also have been presented in energy efficiency action plans, which must be produced every three years. The first plan, based on the Energy Efficiency Directive has to have been drawn up by 30 April 2014.

In the period 1992–2011, the growth of total energy consumption in the EU-27 was 0.2%, while in the period 2000–2011 it was -0.1%, which was 1.5 and 1.1 percentage points below growth in Slovenia, respectively. In 2011, energy consumption growth was negative in the EU-27 (-3.5%) as well as in Slovenia (-3.4%). In the structure of total energy consumption in 2011, the share of liquid fuels in the EU-27 was the same as in Slovenia (35%), while the share of gaseous fuels was considerably higher (23%) and the shares of nuclear energy (14%), solid fuels (17%) and RES (10%) were lower.

In future, as policy goals are directed towards decreasing the impact of the energy sector on the environment, greater structural shifts towards the increase in consumption of natural gas and renewable energy sources and particularly towards improved energy efficiency are expected.

 

 

 



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