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Household electricity consumption is increasing in Slovenia. In 2015, it amounted to 3,205 GWh. The share of households equipped with electricity-consuming appliances is increasing as well. These include e.g. dishwashers, clothes dryers, mobile phones, CD players, microwaves, and personal computers. Despite the energy efficiency of some appliances improved, electricity consumption has not decreased, as the number of household appliances continues to increase rapidly, which also contributes to excessive quantities of waste.


This indicator shows the trends in household electricity consumption and the changes in household equipment with regard to electricity-consuming appliances.


Charts

Figure PG05-1: Final energy consumption in households, Slovenia, 1996-2015
Sources: 
Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia (2017)
Show data

Final energy consumption[(GWh)]

1996

2594

1997

2637

1998

2658

1999

2692

2000

2601

2001

2675

2002

2704

2003

3008

2004

3012

2005

2951

2006

3055

2007

3021

2008

3182

2009

3137

2010

3219.04

2011

3211.25

2012

3179.03

2013

3228.69

2014

3125.43

2015

3205.03

Figure PG05-2: Structure of final energy consumption by end use and energy source, Slovenia, 2015
Sources: 
Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia (2017)
Show data

Space heating[%]

Water heating[%]

Cooking [%]

Lighting[%]

Refrigerators or refrigerators with freezer[%]

Upright or chest freezers[%]

Television[%]

Washing and washing and drying machines (for washing)[%]

Ovens and microwave ovens[%]

Dishwashers[%]

Personal computers and monitors[%]

Dryers and washing and drying machines (for drying)[%]

Air conditioners[%]

Other[%]

2009

18.76

10.14

4.94

7.33

5.97

5.50

4.13

3.90

2.74

3.14

3.12

1.96

2.62

25.75

2010

19.22

10.74

4.89

7.65

6.35

5.93

4.46

4.10

2.84

3.24

3.28

2.06

1.18

24.05

2011

18.55

10.20

4.52

7.54

6.29

5.77

4.40

4.06

2.65

3.01

3.18

1.98

2.19

25.66

2012

18.84

9.84

4.36

7.80

6.59

5.91

4.51

4.24

2.61

2.99

3.23

2.02

2.36

24.70

2013

18.64

9.51

4.08

7.90

6.73

5.89

4.40

4.30

2.50

2.89

3.17

2.00

1.71

26.29

2014

18.51

10.18

3.78

8.13

6.80

5.83

4.23

4.38

2.40

2.75

3.11

1.95

1.49

26.47

2015

19.53

9.59

3.67

8.78

7.05

6.25

4.05

4.63

2.53

2.78

3.16

1.89

1.32

24.78

Figure PG05-3: Final energy consumption by end use, Slovenia, 2015
Sources: 
Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia (2017)
; Jožef Stefan Institut (2017)
Show data

Refrigerator[%]

Washing machine[%]

Colour television[%]

Mobile phone[%]

Freezer[%]

Bicycle[%]

Personal computer[%]

Hi-fi [%]

CD devices[%]

Dishwasher[%]

Microwave[%]

Drier[%]

2015

98.20

96.40

96.20

96

61

55

75.20

42.70

57.20

53.40

32.70

2012

98.50

97.60

97.20

93.30

62.10

61.50

67.10

44

0

52.80

53

26.20

2010

98.60

97.10

97.60

92.60

77.60

63.50

66.50

42.80

52.80

52

54

26

2009

98.30

96.90

97.40

91.60

80.30

63.50

63.70

47.10

56

50.20

52.70

26.20

2008

98.10

96.40

97.10

89.70

81

63.60

60.90

50.60

55

49.30

51

26.20

2007

98.10

96.70

96.50

88.50

82

63.50

56.90

51.90

53.20

47.30

47.40

24.60

2006

98.30

96.60

96.60

86.30

82.10

63.20

54.10

52.40

49.30

45

43.10

22.40

2005

98.40

96.40

96.30

84.70

83.50

61.80

51.50

50.70

45.40

42.30

37.20

19.70

2004

98.31

96.15

96.27

82.30

82.82

59.74

48.40

48.69

41.70

39.91

30.90

17.66

2003

97.88

95.55

95.56

80.10

83.88

57.09

44.90

46.83

39.90

37.50

24

15.57

2002

97.80

96

95.90

74.30

85.30

56.40

40.30

44.90

37

34.40

18.30

14.90

2001

97.20

96.50

95.70

47.60

86.60

57.70

36.50

42.80

23

31.50

14.20

13.90

2000

97.20

96.90

95.30

22

86.70

61.10

33.50

41.60

10.70

30.10

10.90

13

1999

97

96.30

93.90

85.80

63.50

40

0

27.70

11.10

1995

93.80

94.30

88.80

80.60

62.10

26.80

0

18.10

4.50

1990

94.80

93.30

72.40

84.90

68.50

16.70

0

9.90


Goals

·         To establish a framework for specifying the requirements for environmentally conscious design of energy-consuming products

·         To ensure a free flow of these products on the internal market of the European Union.

 


Most impacts of electricity use result from its production. However, consumers can influence the selection of the electricity source, as (pursuant to a 2003 regulation) all companies are now required to provide details of the sources of electricity (i.e. fossil fuel, nuclear, renewable sources) being delivered to customers. In the EU, companies producing and distributing electricity are increasingly marketing electricity from renewable energy sources.

Increasing energy consumption in households is a consequence of the improving standard of living, which results in households with large and small household appliances (air conditioners, clothes dryers, increasing number of lights, etc.), a larger number of TV sets, an increasing number of households, improving information and communication technology in households (growing number of broadband internet connections, growing number of computers and their use in households) and use of other electronic devices (mobile phones, wireless phones, audio-video equipment, etc.).

According to the data provided by the Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia, household electricity consumption is increasing in Slovenia. Between 1996 and 2002 it increased by 4%, which was followed by another increase, by 12 percentage points, in the period from 2002 to 2003. Consumption stabilised after 2003 and increased by around five percentage points between 2003 and 2009.

Since 1990, the share of households equipped with energy-consuming goods has been growing. The main increase was recorded in the number of households equipped with a dishwasher, HI-FI audio devices, clothes dryers and other products that became widely used by households in 2000, such as mobile phones, CD players, microwaves, and personal computers. For instance, only 22% of households owned a mobile telephone in 2000, but by 2009, this percentage had risen to almost 90%. In the same year, more than 96% of households owned a refrigerator, a washing machine and a colour TV. More than 80% of households had a deep freezer and a mobile phone, 60% of all households owned a personal computer and 50% of households owned a HI-FI audio device or a CD player, a dishwasher and a microwave. Around 25% of households also used a clothes dryer.

The breakdown of electricity consumption by purpose showed that in 2015, most household electricity was consumed by large household appliances (refrigerators and freezers, washers, dryers and dishwashers, ovens and microwaves), at 986 GWh or 31 %. Just over 601 GWh (19%) was used to heat domestic hot water, and 325 GWh (10%) was used for space heating. Compared to 2014, the consumption of electricity for personal computers and TVs decreased and amounted to 232 GWh (7%) and lighting 235 GWh (7%).

Consumers can indirectly reduce the impacts of rising electricity consumption by reducing their own electricity consumption, which is enabled by greatly improved energy efficiency of major household appliances as well as energy efficiency labelling of appliances (which now means that the price is no longer the only factor in purchase decisions) and awareness-raising. In using numerous electric and electronic household appliances, particular attention should also be paid to the environmental impact of the waste disposal process.

Energy labelling of household and other appliances presents one of the instruments foreseen for achieving final energy savings provided for in the National Energy Efficiency Action Plan for the Period 2008–2016.

Similar to Slovenia, other EU countries are also witnessing an increase in the share of households equipped with electric and electronic equipment. Energy consumption is increasing despite the improvements made to the above-mentioned equipment. Various studies have shown that despite the improved energy efficiency of appliances by a factor of 2 to 3 in recent years, total household electricity consumption is increasing, mainly due to increased ownership of household appliances. The ‘reverse effect’, when consumption of energy does not decrease despite numerous improvements, has been observed with electronic devices such as TVs, DVD players and personal computers. On average, European households have noted an increase in total energy consumption attributed to these electronic devices, as many households own two or more televisions and personal computers. In addition, an increasing number of electric and electronic devices in households leads not only to increasing energy consumption but also to increasing waste generation.

 

 

 

 


Goals and legal basis

Objectives summarized by: Decree establishing a framework for setting ecodesign requirements for energy-using products, Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia, No. 24/05 (this Regulation in accordance with Directive 2005/32 / EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 6 July 2005 establishing a framework for the setting of ecodesign requirements for energy-using products and amending Council Directive 92/42 / EEC and Directives 96/57 / EC and 2000/55 / EC of the European Parliament and of the Council (OJ L 191, 22.7.2005, p. 29).

Data methodology for this indicator

Methodology and frequency of data collection for the indicator: The data is presented for the period 1990 (1996) - 2009. Data on household electricity consumption are taken from Statistical Yearbook 2010, Chapter 19.2, Balance of Power Generation and Consumption. Purpose-specific electricity use was presented in the First Release, June 12, 2011.
Data on equipping households with durable consumer goods have been collected over the past years by the Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia with the Household Budget Survey questionnaire. Data from the three-year period were recalculated to the middle year and taken into account when interpreting the results for the reference year. They are published on the SI-STAT data portal, in the data series Share of households with durable consumer goods.
Household energy and fuel end-use data by type of energy source will be published annually from 2011 onwards and will no longer be directly comparable to data from previous surveys, as it is now calculated on the basis of a changed methodology. In this way, the 2009 data, most of which were obtained through the Household Energy and Fuel Consumption Survey (APEGG), were already processed. The Jožef Stefan Institute (IJS) participated in the research, where, using the model, they also calculated data on household electricity consumption. The input to the model was the survey results and energy supply data collected through other statistical surveys. During the preparation of the model calculations (May 2011), data on energy supply for the year 2009 were available, and therefore the model calculations refer to that year.

Data processing methodology: The average annual growth rates of final energy consumption are calculated as [(last year / base year) (1 / number of years) -1] x 100

Source data base
Statistical Yearbook 2010 and 2017, Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia
Data administrator

Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia

Date of data source summarization
13.06.2017
Geographical coverage
Slovenia
Source data base
SI-STAT Database, Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia
Data administrator

Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia

Date of data source summarization
13.06.2017
Geographical coverage
Slovenia
Information about the quality of this indicator

Information concerning data quality:

Advantages and disadvantages of the indicator: The methodology for collecting data on final energy consumption and fuels in households changed in 2011, so that the data are not directly comparable with the results of the Household Energy and Fuels Survey from 1997 to 2003.
Relevance, accuracy, robustness, uncertainty:
Reliability of the indicator (archive data): The data is reliable.
Uncertainty of the indicator (scenarios / projections): Scenarios and projections not available.
Overall assessment (1 = no major comments, 3 = data to be considered with reservation): 2
Relevance: 2
Accuracy: 1
Completeness over time: 1
Completeness over space: 1


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